Birds of Guernsey Trivia Questions

In 1879, what was the most common bird species observed in Guernsey and its neighboring islands?

  • The White-tailed Eagle
  • The Linnet
  • The Peregrine Falcon
  • The Kestrel

Correct Answer: The Linnet

Correct Answer Explanation: The Linnet, a small, brown-colored bird, was noted to be the most numerous bird species observed in the Channel Islands at the time.

What is the name given to the bird known locally as the “Mackerel Bird” in Guernsey?

  • The Cuckoo
  • The Wryneck
  • The Kingfisher
  • The Hoopoe

Correct Answer: The Wryneck

Correct Answer Explanation: The Wryneck, a small, slender bird with a distinctive habit of twisting its head, was known as the “Mackerel Bird” by locals due to its arrival coinciding with the mackerel fishing season.

Which bird species was mentioned as being a rare visitor to the Channel Islands, potentially even breeding in Guernsey in the past?

  • The Golden Oriole
  • The Mistletoe Thrush
  • The Black Redstart
  • The Reed Warbler

Correct Answer: The Golden Oriole

Correct Answer Explanation: The Golden Oriole, a vibrant yellow and black bird, was considered a rare visitor to the Islands. It was suggested that the species may have bred in Guernsey in the past.

In the context of the book, what is a “clos du valle” ?

  • A traditional Guernsey farmhouse
  • A specific type of bird trap used in Guernsey
  • A large valley located in Guernsey
  • A local dialect word for a type of local bird

Correct Answer: A large valley located in Guernsey

Correct Answer Explanation: “Clos du valle” refers to the Vale, a large valley in Guernsey, mentioned in the book as a place where various bird species were observed.

What did Cecil Smith propose as a more effective way to protect birds from over-exploitation than the existing Sea-bird Protection Act?

  • Stricter enforcement of existing laws
  • Public education campaigns to raise awareness about bird conservation
  • A gun-tax to discourage hunting
  • Introducing new laws banning the hunting of certain bird species

Correct Answer: A gun-tax to discourage hunting

Correct Answer Explanation: Cecil Smith, the author of “Birds of Guernsey (1879)”, suggested implementing a gun-tax as a more effective way to discourage hunting and protect bird populations.

Which species was mentioned as an occasional straggler, potentially more frequent than believed, but was considered rare in the Channel Islands?

  • The Bewick’s Swan
  • The Common Coot
  • The Smew
  • The Hoopoe

Correct Answer: The Bewick’s Swan

Correct Answer Explanation: The Bewick’s Swan, a smaller swan species with a distinctive black and white pattern on its head, was mentioned as a rare visitor but potentially more common than initially thought.

Which type of hawk was considered the most common in the Channel Islands during 1879?

  • The Sparrowhawk
  • The Hobby
  • The Kestrel
  • The Merlin

Correct Answer: The Kestrel

Correct Answer Explanation: The Kestrel, a small falcon with a distinctive hovering flight pattern, was noted as the most common hawk species in the Channel Islands, breeding across all the islands.

What was the term used to describe the bird droppings, which was a valuable fertilizer, as mentioned in the text?

  • Flappers
  • Guano
  • Furze
  • L’Eree

Correct Answer: Guano

Correct Answer Explanation: Guano, the droppings of seabirds, was a valuable fertilizer widely used in agriculture in Guernsey at the time.

Which bird species was described as a regular and numerous autumnal visitor, often seen in large flocks?

  • The Redwing
  • The Golden Plover
  • The Common Starling
  • The Blackbird

Correct Answer: The Common Starling

Correct Answer Explanation: The Common Starling, a black bird with a metallic sheen, was observed in large flocks during the autumn season, making it a regular and numerous visitor.

What was the name of the small island near Sark, mentioned in the book?

  • Burhou
  • Ortack Rock
  • Le Tas
  • Herm

Correct Answer: Le Tas

Correct Answer Explanation: Le Tas, a small island near Sark, was mentioned as a breeding ground for various seabird species.

Which species was considered a common resident in all the islands, but became rarer in Guernsey?

  • The Pied Wagtail
  • The Wren
  • The Rock Pipit
  • The Grey Wagtail

Correct Answer: The Pied Wagtail

Correct Answer Explanation: The Pied Wagtail, a black and white bird with a distinctive wagging tail, was becoming rarer in Guernsey, potentially due to changes in agricultural practices or other environmental factors.

What is the name given to the steep, narrow passage on the island of Sark, mentioned in the book?

  • La Coupée
  • Le Cheminant
  • L’Ancresse Common
  • Petit Bo Bay

Correct Answer: La Coupée

Correct Answer Explanation: La Coupée, a steep and narrow passageway on the island of Sark, was mentioned in the text.

What was the name of the large area of open land in Guernsey, mentioned as a habitat for various bird species?

  • L’Ancresse Common
  • L’Eree
  • The Clos du Valle
  • Le Tas

Correct Answer: L’Ancresse Common

Correct Answer Explanation: L’Ancresse Common, a large expanse of open land in Guernsey, was mentioned as a habitat for various bird species, including the Golden-crested Wren.

Which species was mentioned as a regular but not very numerous autumnal visitor, possibly occurring more often than is suspected?

  • The Bewick’s Swan
  • The American Bittern
  • The Smew
  • The Guillemot

Correct Answer: The Bewick’s Swan

Correct Answer Explanation: The Bewick’s Swan, a smaller swan species with a distinctive black and white pattern on its head, was mentioned as a rare visitor but potentially more common than initially thought.

What was the name of the historical tower in Guernsey, mentioned in the text?

  • Queen’s Tower
  • L’Hyvreuse
  • Moulin Huet
  • Le Cheminant

Correct Answer: Queen’s Tower

Correct Answer Explanation: Queen’s Tower, a historical structure in Guernsey, was mentioned in the text.

Which bird species was described as a regular and rather numerous autumn and winter visitor?

  • The Sclavonian Grebe
  • The Great Northern Diver
  • The Black-throated Diver
  • The Red-throated Diver

Correct Answer: The Sclavonian Grebe

Correct Answer Explanation: The Sclavonian Grebe, a medium-sized grebe with a distinctive black and white plumage, was observed as a regular and numerous visitor during the autumn and winter seasons.

Which bird species was considered the most numerous seabird in the Channel Islands in 1879?

  • The Gannet
  • The Puffin
  • The Shag
  • The Guillemot

Correct Answer: The Shag

Correct Answer Explanation: The Shag, a black-and-white seabird closely related to the Cormorant, was the most numerous seabird in the Channel Islands at the time, breeding across all the islands.

What was the name of the small island near Sark, mentioned as a breeding ground for various seabird species, including the Storm Petrel?

  • Burhou
  • Ortack Rock
  • Le Tas
  • Herm

Correct Answer: Le Tas

Correct Answer Explanation: Le Tas, a small island near Sark, was mentioned as a breeding ground for various seabird species, including the Storm Petrel.

Which species was considered a rare visitor and occasionally wandered into the Channel Islands?

  • The American Bittern
  • The Great Shearwater
  • The Little Gull
  • The Purple Heron

Correct Answer: The Great Shearwater

Correct Answer Explanation: The Great Shearwater, a large seabird with a distinctive black and white plumage, was an occasional visitor to the Channel Islands, sometimes wandering from its usual breeding grounds.

What was the name of the bay on Guernsey, mentioned in the text, known for its large area of open land?

  • Vazon Bay
  • Moulin Huet
  • Petit Bo Bay
  • L’Eree

Correct Answer: L’Eree

Correct Answer Explanation: L’Eree, a bay on Guernsey, was mentioned as a location with a large area of open land that was home to various bird species.

Which bird species was described as a common autumn and winter visitor to the Channel Islands?

  • The Common Scoter
  • The Pintail
  • The Teal
  • The Wild Duck

Correct Answer: The Common Scoter

Correct Answer Explanation: The Common Scoter, a large diving duck with a distinctive black plumage, was a common visitor during the autumn and winter seasons, often found in large flocks.

Which bird species was mentioned as a regular and uncommon visitor to the Channel Islands, potentially breeding on Burhou?

  • The Cormorant
  • The Razorbill
  • The Guillemot
  • The Puffin

Correct Answer: The Cormorant

Correct Answer Explanation: The Cormorant, a large, black seabird with a distinctive hooked beak, was considered uncommon in the Channel Islands, and was known to breed on Burhou, a small island near Alderney.

What was the name of the rock between Burhou and the Caskets, mentioned in the text?

  • Le Tas
  • Ortack Rock
  • L’Hyvreuse
  • L’Ancresse Common

Correct Answer: Ortack Rock

Correct Answer Explanation: Ortack Rock, a rock located between Burhou and the Caskets, was mentioned in the text as a potential breeding site for seabirds.

Which bird species was considered a common resident in Guernsey and Sark, potentially increasing in numbers?

  • The Goldfinch
  • The Linnet
  • The Bullfinch
  • The Siskin

Correct Answer: The Goldfinch

Correct Answer Explanation: The Goldfinch, a small, brightly colored bird with a distinctive black and white pattern on its wings, was a resident in Guernsey and Sark, and was noted as potentially increasing in numbers.

What was the name of the farm in Guernsey, mentioned in the text, potentially known for its bird life?

  • Rousaileries
  • Le Cheminant
  • L’Hyvreuse
  • Moulin Huet

Correct Answer: Rousaileries

Correct Answer Explanation: Rousaileries, a farm in Guernsey, was mentioned in the text.

Which bird species was considered rare and accidental, possibly occurring more often than suspected?

  • The Bewick’s Swan
  • The American Bittern
  • The Smew
  • The Hoopoe

Correct Answer: The Bewick’s Swan

Correct Answer Explanation: The Bewick’s Swan, a smaller swan species with a distinctive black and white pattern on its head, was mentioned as a rare visitor but potentially more common than initially thought.

Which bird species was considered a rare visitor to the Channel Islands, potentially only having one documented occurrence in Guernsey?

  • The Dartford Warbler
  • The Whitethroat
  • The Lesser Whitethroat
  • The Blackcap

Correct Answer: The Dartford Warbler

Correct Answer Explanation: The Dartford Warbler, a small, colorful bird with a distinctive long tail, was considered rare in the Channel Islands, with only one documented record of its occurrence in Guernsey.

Which bird species was described as being a regular but not numerous summer visitor to Guernsey?

  • The Lesser Whitethroat
  • The Blackcap
  • The Willow Wren
  • The Chiffchaff

Correct Answer: The Lesser Whitethroat

Correct Answer Explanation: The Lesser Whitethroat, a small, gray bird with a distinctive light-colored throat, was considered a regular but not numerous summer visitor to Guernsey.

Which species was mentioned as a resident in all the islands except for Alderney?

  • The Great Tit
  • The Blue Tit
  • The Tree-creeper
  • The Long-tailed Tit

Correct Answer: The Tree-creeper

Correct Answer Explanation: The Tree-creeper, a small, brown bird with a distinctive downward movement along tree trunks, was found in all the islands except for Alderney.

Which species was described as a regular and tolerably numerous autumn and winter visitor to the Channel Islands?

  • The Goosander
  • The Red-breasted Merganser
  • The Smew
  • The Little Grebe

Correct Answer: The Goosander

Correct Answer Explanation: The Goosander, a large, diving duck with a distinctive black and white plumage, was observed as a regular and tolerably numerous visitor during the autumn and winter seasons.

Which bird species was mentioned as a common resident in all the islands, but was not as common in England?

  • The Ring Ouzel
  • The Hedgesparrow
  • The Robin
  • The Blackbird

Correct Answer: The Ring Ouzel

Correct Answer Explanation: The Ring Ouzel, a black bird with a distinctive white band around its breast, was a common resident in all the islands, but was not as common as in England.

Which species was mentioned as an occasional straggler, potentially being more frequent than believed?

  • The Fire-crested Wren
  • The Waxwing
  • The White Wagtail
  • The Yellow Wagtail

Correct Answer: The Fire-crested Wren

Correct Answer Explanation: The Fire-crested Wren, a small, colorful bird with a distinctive orange and black plumage, was mentioned as an occasional straggler, potentially being more frequent than believed.

Which species was described as a regular and numerous autumnal visitor to all the Islands?

  • The Redwing
  • The Fieldfare
  • The Blackbird
  • The Ring Ouzel

Correct Answer: The Redwing

Correct Answer Explanation: The Redwing, a small, reddish-brown thrush, was a regular and numerous autumnal visitor to all the islands, often seen in large flocks.

Which species was mentioned as a rare visitor, potentially seen in Guernsey, but was considered more common in South Devon?

  • The Redstart
  • The Stonechat
  • The Whinchat
  • The Wheatear

Correct Answer: The Redstart

Correct Answer Explanation: The Redstart, a small, colorful bird with a distinctive reddish tail, was mentioned as a rare visitor to the Channel Islands, potentially seen in Guernsey, but was more common in South Devon.

Which species was described as a common summer visitor to the Channel Islands?

  • The Wheatear
  • The Reed Warbler
  • The Sedge Warbler
  • The Whitethroat

Correct Answer: The Wheatear

Correct Answer Explanation: The Wheatear, a small, gray bird with a distinctive black and white head, was a common summer visitor to the Channel Islands.

Which species was mentioned as a regular, though not numerous, summer visitor to Guernsey?

  • The Blackcap
  • The Willow Wren
  • The Chiffchaff
  • The Golden-crested Wren

Correct Answer: The Blackcap

Correct Answer Explanation: The Blackcap, a small, black and white bird with a distinctive black cap, was a regular, though not numerous, summer visitor to Guernsey.

Which species was mentioned as a regular but not very numerous winter visitor to all the Islands?

  • The Grey Plover
  • The Golden Plover
  • The Dotterel
  • The Ring Dotterel

Correct Answer: The Grey Plover

Correct Answer Explanation: The Grey Plover, a medium-sized shorebird with a distinctive gray and black plumage, was a regular but not very numerous winter visitor to all the Islands.

Which species was described as a common winter visitor to all the Islands?

  • The Golden Plover
  • The Dotterel
  • The Ring Dotterel
  • The Kentish Plover

Correct Answer: The Golden Plover

Correct Answer Explanation: The Golden Plover, a medium-sized shorebird with a distinctive golden plumage, was a common winter visitor to all the islands.

Which species was mentioned as a rare occasional visitor to the Channel Islands?

  • The Dotterel
  • The Ring Dotterel
  • The Kentish Plover
  • The Turnstone

Correct Answer: The Dotterel

Correct Answer Explanation: The Dotterel, a small, gray and black shorebird with a distinctive black breast band, was a rare occasional visitor to the Channel Islands.

Which species was described as a common summer visitor to the Channel Islands?

  • The Kentish Plover
  • The Turnstone
  • The Curlew
  • The Whimbrel

Correct Answer: The Kentish Plover

Correct Answer Explanation: The Kentish Plover, a small shorebird with a distinctive black and white plumage, was a common summer visitor to the Channel Islands, breeding across all the islands.

Which species was mentioned as a regular and numerous autumnal visitor to all the Islands, but was not as common as on the south and west coast of England?

  • The Knot
  • The Curlew Sandpiper
  • The Purre
  • The Little Stint

Correct Answer: The Knot

Correct Answer Explanation: The Knot, a small shorebird with a distinctive gray and black plumage, was a regular and numerous autumnal visitor to all the islands, but was not as common as on the south and west coast of England.

Which species was mentioned as an occasional visitor on both spring and autumn migration, potentially remaining to breed?

  • The Common Sandpiper
  • The Greenshank
  • The Ruff
  • The Woodcock

Correct Answer: The Common Sandpiper

Correct Answer Explanation: The Common Sandpiper, a small, gray and white shorebird with a distinctive long legs, was an occasional visitor on both spring and autumn migration, sometimes remaining to breed.

Which species was described as a regular and numerous autumnal visitor to the Channel Islands?

  • The Common Snipe
  • The Jack Snipe
  • The Knot
  • The Curlew Sandpiper

Correct Answer: The Common Snipe

Correct Answer Explanation: The Common Snipe, a medium-sized shorebird with a distinctive long beak and distinctive flight pattern, was a regular and numerous autumnal visitor to the Channel Islands.

Which species was mentioned as a regular, though not very numerous, autumnal visitor to the Channel Islands?

  • The Snow Bunting
  • The Bunting
  • The Yellow Hammer
  • The Chaffinch

Correct Answer: The Snow Bunting

Correct Answer Explanation: The Snow Bunting, a small, white and black bird with a distinctive black head, was a regular, though not very numerous, autumnal visitor to the Channel Islands.

Which species was described as a common and resident in all the Islands?

  • The House Sparrow
  • The Hawfinch
  • The Greenfinch
  • The Goldfinch

Correct Answer: The House Sparrow

Correct Answer Explanation: The House Sparrow, a small, brown bird with a distinctive black bib, was a common and resident in all the islands, often found in large flocks.

Which species was described as a regular and tolerably common autumnal visitor to the Channel Islands?

  • The Woodcock
  • The Solitary Snipe
  • The Common Snipe
  • The Jack Snipe

Correct Answer: The Woodcock

Correct Answer Explanation: The Woodcock, a medium-sized shorebird with a distinctive long beak and mottled brown plumage, was a regular and tolerably common autumnal visitor to the Channel Islands.

Which species was mentioned as a common autumn and winter visitor to the Channel Islands?

  • The Common Scoter
  • The Goosander
  • The Red-breasted Merganser
  • The Smew

Correct Answer: The Common Scoter

Correct Answer Explanation: The Common Scoter, a large diving duck with a distinctive black plumage, was a common visitor during the autumn and winter seasons, often found in large flocks.

Which species was described as a regular autumn and winter visitor to the Channel Islands?

  • The Black-throated Diver
  • The Red-throated Diver
  • The Great Northern Diver
  • The Guillemot

Correct Answer: The Red-throated Diver

Correct Answer Explanation: The Red-throated Diver, a medium-sized diving bird with a distinctive reddish throat, was a regular autumn and winter visitor to the Channel Islands.

Which species was described as a regular and numerous autumn and winter visitor to the Channel Islands, breeding in a small station on Alderney?

  • The Guillemot
  • The Little Auk
  • The Puffin
  • The Razorbill

Correct Answer: The Guillemot

Correct Answer Explanation: The Guillemot, a small, black and white seabird with a distinctive pointed beak, was a regular and numerous autumn and winter visitor to the Channel Islands, breeding in a small station on Alderney.

Which species was mentioned as a rare visitor, potentially occurring more often than is suspected?

  • The Bewick’s Swan
  • The American Bittern
  • The Smew
  • The Hoopoe

Correct Answer: The Bewick’s Swan

Correct Answer Explanation: The Bewick’s Swan, a smaller swan species with a distinctive black and white pattern on its head, was mentioned as a rare visitor but potentially more common than initially thought.

Which bird species was considered rare and accidental, possibly occurring more often than believed?

  • The American Bittern
  • The Squacco Heron
  • The Spoonbill
  • The White-fronted Goose

Correct Answer: The American Bittern

Correct Answer Explanation: The American Bittern, a large, brown heron with a distinctive cryptic plumage, was considered a rare and accidental visitor, possibly occurring more often than believed.

Which species was described as a regular but not very numerous autumnal visitor to all the Islands?

  • The Teal
  • The Eider Duck
  • The Common Scoter
  • The Goosander

Correct Answer: The Teal

Correct Answer Explanation: The Teal, a small, brown duck with a distinctive green head, was a regular but not very numerous autumnal visitor to all the islands.

Which species was mentioned as a common and resident in all the Islands, but did not breed there?

  • The Heron
  • The Purple Heron
  • The Squacco Heron
  • The Bittern

Correct Answer: The Heron

Correct Answer Explanation: The Heron, a large, gray wading bird with a distinctive long neck and long legs, was a common and resident in all the islands, but did not breed there.

Which species was mentioned as an occasional visitor to the Channel Islands?

  • The Little Bustard
  • The Thick-knee
  • The Peewit
  • The Grey Plover

Correct Answer: The Little Bustard

Correct Answer Explanation: The Little Bustard, a small, brown bird with a distinctive long legs, was an occasional visitor to the Channel Islands.

Which species was described as a common autumn and winter visitor to the Channel Islands?

  • The Grey Plover
  • The Golden Plover
  • The Dotterel
  • The Ring Dotterel

Correct Answer: The Grey Plover

Correct Answer Explanation: The Grey Plover, a medium-sized shorebird with a distinctive gray and black plumage, was a regular but not very numerous winter visitor to all the Islands.

Which species was described as a regular summer visitor to the Channel Islands?

  • The Landrail
  • The Moorhen
  • The Common Coot
  • The Little Bustard

Correct Answer: The Landrail

Correct Answer Explanation: The Landrail, a small, brown bird with a distinctive long legs, was a regular summer visitor to the Channel Islands.

Which species was mentioned as a regular and numerous summer visitor, more local than the Swallow?

  • The Martin
  • The Sand Martin
  • The Wood Pigeon
  • The Rock Dove

Correct Answer: The Martin

Correct Answer Explanation: The Martin, a small, black and white bird with a distinctive forked tail, was a regular and numerous summer visitor to the Channel Islands, but was more local in its distribution than the Swallow.

Which species was described as a common summer visitor to the Channel Islands?

  • The Swallow
  • The Sand Martin
  • The Wood Pigeon
  • The Rock Dove

Correct Answer: The Swallow

Correct Answer Explanation: The Swallow, a small, black and white bird with a distinctive forked tail, was a common summer visitor to the Channel Islands.

Which species was mentioned as a regular autumnal visitor, but did not remain to breed?

  • The Sand Martin
  • The Wood Pigeon
  • The Rock Dove
  • The Turtle Dove

Correct Answer: The Sand Martin

Correct Answer Explanation: The Sand Martin, a small, brown and white bird with a distinctive short wings, was a regular autumnal visitor to the Channel Islands, but did not remain to breed.

Which species was described as a resident in Guernsey and Sark?

  • The Barn Owl
  • The Red-backed Shrike
  • The Spotted Flycatcher
  • The Golden Oriole

Correct Answer: The Barn Owl

Correct Answer Explanation: The Barn Owl, a white owl with a distinctive heart-shaped face, was a resident in Guernsey and Sark, often found in barns and other buildings.

Which species was mentioned as a regular and numerous summer visitor, found in all the Islands?

  • The Spotted Flycatcher
  • The Golden Oriole
  • The Dipper
  • The Mistletoe Thrush

Correct Answer: The Spotted Flycatcher

Correct Answer Explanation: The Spotted Flycatcher, a small, gray bird with a distinctive black and white plumage, was a regular and numerous summer visitor, found in all the islands.

Which species was described as a regular summer visitor to the Channel Islands, potentially breeding in the Islands?

  • The Red-backed Shrike
  • The Spotted Flycatcher
  • The Golden Oriole
  • The Dipper

Correct Answer: The Red-backed Shrike

Correct Answer Explanation: The Red-backed Shrike, a small, black and white bird with a distinctive black mask, was a regular summer visitor to the Channel Islands, potentially breeding in the Islands.

Which species was described as a resident in Guernsey and Alderney?

  • The Dipper
  • The Mistletoe Thrush
  • The Song Thrush
  • The Redwing

Correct Answer: The Dipper

Correct Answer Explanation: The Dipper, a small, brown bird with a distinctive white breast, was a resident in Guernsey and Alderney, often found near streams and rivers.

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