History of New Bedford Trivia Questions

1. A Whaling Legacy: New Bedford was a major player in the whaling industry for over a century. What did the discovery of petroleum in the mid-19th century do to the industry?

  • a) Boosted the popularity of sperm oil as a lubricant
  • b) Led to the creation of new whaling technologies
  • c) Caused a steep decline in the whaling industry
  • d) Increased the demand for whale products

Answer: c) Caused a steep decline in the whaling industry

Explanation: The discovery of petroleum, a more readily available and cheaper alternative, significantly decreased the demand for whale oil, leading to a decline in the whaling industry.

2. A City of Firsts: New Bedford witnessed the display of the American flag in British waters for the first time. Which ship, built in New Bedford, carried this symbolic flag?

  • a) The “Dartmouth”
  • b) The “Bedford”
  • c) The “Union”
  • d) The “Ann Alexander”

Answer: b) The “Bedford”

Explanation: The ship “Bedford,” constructed in New Bedford, was the first vessel to display the American flag in British waters after the American Revolutionary War in 1783.

3. A Wartime Sacrifice: During the Civil War, New Bedford played a pivotal role in supporting the Union cause. What was the “Stone Fleet,” a group of ships filled with stone ballast and sunk at the mouth of southern harbors?

  • a) A fleet of warships sent to attack Confederate ships
  • b) A fleet of ships used to transport troops and supplies
  • c) A fleet of ships used to blockade Confederate ports
  • d) A fleet of ships used to rescue stranded whalers

Answer: c) A fleet of ships used to blockade Confederate ports

Explanation: The “Stone Fleet” was a strategic measure used by the Union Navy to block Confederate ports, preventing the flow of supplies and hindering Confederate blockade runners.

4. A City in Transition: While whaling dominated New Bedford’s early history, what industry took its place and propelled the city into the 20th century?

  • a) Fishing
  • b) Shipbuilding
  • c) Textile manufacturing
  • d) Coal mining

Answer: c) Textile manufacturing

Explanation: As the whaling industry declined, New Bedford transitioned to cotton manufacturing, becoming a major textile center by the late 19th century.

5. A Tragedy at Sea: A sperm whale’s fury claimed the life of a Nantucket whaleship, highlighting the inherent dangers of whaling. What was the name of this unfortunate vessel?

  • a) The “Splendid”
  • b) The “Ann Alexander”
  • c) The “Belvedere”
  • d) The “Union”

Answer: d) The “Union”

Explanation: The “Union,” a Nantucket whaleship, was sunk by an enraged sperm whale in 1807. This tragic incident underscores the inherent risks faced by whalers.

6. A City Under Siege: New Bedford faced a significant challenge during the Revolutionary War. What was the estimated value of property destroyed during the British invasion of New Bedford in 1778?

  • a) £500 (about $1,000 today)
  • b) £5,000 (about $10,000 today)
  • c) £50,000 (about $100,000 today)
  • d) £105,000 (over $500,000 today)

Answer: d) £105,000 (over $500,000 today)

Explanation: The British invasion of New Bedford in 1778 resulted in the destruction of numerous stores, warehouses, and ships, with estimated damages exceeding £105,000.

7. A History of Resilience: New Bedford experienced a smallpox epidemic in 1871. What happened to the “Belvedere,” a whaling ship that was nearly lost during this outbreak?

  • a) It sank in a storm
  • b) It was captured by a Confederate raider
  • c) It was abandoned in the Arctic
  • d) It navigated through the ice pack under sail after losing its propeller

Answer: d) It navigated through the ice pack under sail after losing its propeller

Explanation: Despite a smallpox outbreak that nearly decimated the crew, Captain Tilton managed to navigate the “Belvedere” through the ice pack under sail after losing its propeller.

8. A City’s Identity: New Bedford’s name has a unique origin. What happened to the original “Bedford” that prompted the town’s name change?

  • a) It was destroyed by a fire
  • b) It was renamed by the colonists
  • c) It was already occupied by another settlement
  • d) It was given a new name to honor a local hero

Answer: c) It was already occupied by another settlement

Explanation: The village was initially named “Bedford,” but the name was changed to “New Bedford” because another settlement in the colony already bore the same name.

9. A Whaling Legend: A remarkable 983 pounds of ambergris, a valuable substance found in whale intestines, was recovered in 1882. What was the name of the bark that made this historic catch?

  • a) The “Bedford”
  • b) The “Union”
  • c) The “Belvedere”
  • d) The “Splendid”

Answer: d) The “Splendid”

Explanation: The “Splendid” captured an ambergris-laden sperm whale in 1882, yielding 983 pounds of ambergris – the largest and richest catch ever reported.

10. A City of Innovation: New Bedford’s whaling industry was a catalyst for advancements in maritime technology. What were “toggle irons” used for?

  • a) Repairing ships at sea
  • b) Navigating through treacherous waters
  • c) Capturing and securing whales
  • d) Processing whale oil and blubber

Answer: c) Capturing and securing whales

Explanation: Toggle irons were a type of harpoon designed for capturing and securing whales. These specialized tools played a critical role in the whaling industry.

11. An Unexpected Hero: A New Bedford man emerged as a hero during the Civil War. Who was Sergeant William H. Carney, and what did he do during the attack on Fort Wagner?

  • a) He led a daring raid on a Confederate supply depot
  • b) He rescued a wounded comrade under heavy fire
  • c) He saved the regimental flag after the color bearer was disabled
  • d) He used his knowledge of the local terrain to outmaneuver the enemy

Answer: c) He saved the regimental flag after the color bearer was disabled

Explanation: Sergeant William H. Carney, a New Bedford man, bravely saved the regimental flag after the color bearer was disabled during the attack on Fort Wagner, a significant act of heroism during the Civil War.

12. A Town’s Transformation: New Bedford underwent a major shift in its economic landscape. What was the approximate population of New Bedford in 1846, marking the peak of the whaling industry?

  • a) 2,000
  • b) 5,000
  • c) 10,000
  • d) 16,000

Answer: d) 16,000

Explanation: In 1846, at the height of the whaling era, New Bedford’s population was approximately 16,000.

13. A City’s Legacy: Despite its maritime roots, New Bedford evolved into a center of industrial might. What was the estimated value of all manufacturing companies in New Bedford, excluding cotton mills, in 1916?

  • a) $573,000
  • b) $1,573,000
  • c) $5,730,000
  • d) $15,730,000

Answer: c) $5,730,000

Explanation: In 1916, the combined capital of manufacturing companies in New Bedford, excluding cotton mills, was estimated at $5,730,000, showcasing the city’s diversified economic base.

14. A Whaling Trailblazer: Who was Joseph Rotch, and what role did he play in New Bedford’s early history?

  • a) A shipbuilder who designed the first whaling vessels
  • b) A whaling captain who led daring expeditions to the Arctic
  • c) An enterprising merchant who brought capital and experience to the whaling industry
  • d) A local politician who advocated for the expansion of whaling operations

Answer: c) An enterprising merchant who brought capital and experience to the whaling industry

Explanation: Joseph Rotch, an ambitious merchant from Nantucket, settled in New Bedford in 1765, bringing with him capital, business acumen, and valuable experience that helped shape the development of the whaling industry.

15. A City’s Beginnings: What geographic feature did Bartholomew Gosnold discover in 1602, laying the foundation for New Bedford’s future?

  • a) The Acushnet River
  • b) The Sconticut Neck
  • c) Clark’s Point
  • d) Horse Neck

Answer: a) The Acushnet River

Explanation: Bartholomew Gosnold discovered the Acushnet River in 1602, a significant geographic feature that played a pivotal role in the development of New Bedford.

16. A City’s Heart: What was “The Cove” in early New Bedford, a location that held significance in the town’s development?

  • a) A secluded beach popular with local fishermen
  • b) A small cove near Clark’s Point where the almshouse was located
  • c) A forested area on the outskirts of the town
  • d) A meeting place for local merchants and traders

Answer: b) A small cove near Clark’s Point where the almshouse was located

Explanation: “The Cove” was a small cove near Clark’s Point, a location that played a role in the town’s development, particularly with the establishment of the almshouse.

17. A City’s Education: New Bedford has a rich history of education. What was the number of school buildings in New Bedford in 1916?

  • a) 14
  • b) 24
  • c) 34
  • d) 54

Answer: d) 54

Explanation: In 1916, New Bedford boasted 54 school buildings, reflecting the city’s commitment to education.

18. A City’s Library: New Bedford has a thriving public library system. What was the approximate number of volumes and pictures in the New Bedford Free Public Library in 1916?

  • a) 20,000 volumes and 10,000 pictures
  • b) 40,000 volumes and 20,000 pictures
  • c) 80,000 volumes and 40,000 pictures
  • d) 160,000 volumes and 40,000 pictures

Answer: d) 160,000 volumes and 40,000 pictures

Explanation: In 1916, the New Bedford Free Public Library housed an impressive collection of 160,000 volumes and 40,000 pictures, demonstrating the city’s commitment to preserving its cultural heritage.

19. A Whaling Disaster: The “Alabama” and the “Shenandoah,” Confederate cruisers, wreaked havoc on New Bedford’s whaling fleet during the Civil War. How many New Bedford whalers were burned by these ships?

  • a) 5
  • b) 15
  • c) 25
  • d) 35

Answer: c) 25

Explanation: The Confederate cruisers “Alabama” and “Shenandoah” burned a total of 25 New Bedford whalers, causing significant damage to the city’s economy.

20. A City’s Growth: New Bedford’s population increased significantly over time. What was the approximate population of New Bedford in 1916, reflecting its growth as a textile center?

  • a) 40,000
  • b) 80,000
  • c) 120,000
  • d) 160,000

Answer: c) 120,000

Explanation: By 1916, New Bedford’s population had risen to approximately 120,000, a testament to its growth as a textile manufacturing center.

21. A City’s History: New Bedford’s whaling industry brought about advancements in maritime technology. What is a “try house,” a structure associated with the whaling industry?

  • a) A building where whaling equipment was stored
  • b) A place where captured whales were weighed and measured
  • c) A structure used for processing whale blubber into oil
  • d) A ship that was specially designed for hunting whales

Answer: c) A structure used for processing whale blubber into oil

Explanation: A “try house” was a structure used for processing whale blubber into oil, an essential step in the whaling industry.

22. A City’s Heart: New Bedford has several landmarks that reflect its history. What is Sconticut Neck, a peninsula on the east side of the Acushnet River?

  • a) A historic shipyard that built many whaling ships
  • b) A location where the first textile mill was built
  • c) A park that is popular with local residents
  • d) A site where a major battle of the Revolutionary War took place

Answer: c) A park that is popular with local residents

Explanation: Sconticut Neck is a peninsula on the east side of the Acushnet River that is now a park, offering recreational opportunities to local residents.

23. A City’s Industry: New Bedford’s textile industry reached its peak in the early 20th century. What was the number of spindles operating in New Bedford’s cotton mills in 1916?

  • a) 1,259,793
  • b) 2,259,793
  • c) 3,259,793
  • d) 4,259,793

Answer: c) 3,259,793

Explanation: In 1916, New Bedford’s cotton mills operated 3,259,793 spindles, making it the largest cotton mill city in the United States.

24. A City’s Whaling Heritage: New Bedford’s whaling industry faced numerous challenges, including the loss of vessels. What was the estimated value of 32 New Bedford whaleships abandoned in the Arctic in 1871?

  • a) $109,000
  • b) $509,000
  • c) $1,090,000
  • d) $1,590,000

Answer: c) $1,090,000

Explanation: The loss of 32 New Bedford whaleships in the Arctic in 1871 was estimated at $1,090,000, highlighting the financial risks associated with the whaling industry.

25. A City’s Valor: New Bedford contributed to the Union cause during the Civil War. What was the number of men from New Bedford who served in the military during the war?

  • a) 1,200
  • b) 2,200
  • c) 3,200
  • d) 4,200

Answer: c) 3,200

Explanation: New Bedford provided over 3,200 men for military service during the Civil War, demonstrating its commitment to the Union cause.

26. A City’s Growth: New Bedford’s assessed valuation reflects its economic development. What was the total assessed valuation of New Bedford in 1916?

  • a) $53,121,793
  • b) $83,121,793
  • c) $113,121,793
  • d) $143,121,793

Answer: c) $113,121,793

Explanation: In 1916, the total assessed valuation of New Bedford was $113,121,793, showcasing the city’s economic growth and prosperity.

27. A City’s History: New Bedford’s history is marked by significant events. What was the “Ark,” a structure that became a notorious den of vice and crime in the city’s early days?

  • a) A former whaling ship used as a prison
  • b) A theater that hosted controversial performances
  • c) A dilapidated building used as a gambling den
  • d) A tavern that served as a gathering place for sailors

Answer: a) A former whaling ship used as a prison

Explanation: The “Ark,” a former whaling ship, was converted into a prison but became a notorious den of vice and crime, ultimately leading to its destruction by citizens.

28. A City’s Resilience: New Bedford has experienced numerous storms throughout its history. What was the “Great Gale” of 1815 known for?

  • a) A heavy snowstorm that paralyzed the city
  • b) A severe hurricane that caused widespread damage
  • c) A strong windstorm that destroyed the Bedford-Fairhaven bridge
  • d) A tidal surge that flooded the city’s waterfront

Answer: c) A strong windstorm that destroyed the Bedford-Fairhaven bridge

Explanation: The “Great Gale” of 1815 was a strong windstorm that caused widespread damage in New Bedford, including the destruction of the Bedford-Fairhaven bridge.

29. A City’s Name: New Bedford’s name reflects a connection to a prominent figure in British history. Who was the Duke of Bedford, the namesake of the city?

  • a) A British admiral who defeated the French fleet
  • b) A British general who commanded troops in the American Revolution
  • c) A British monarch who ruled during the 18th century
  • d) A British statesman who played a role in the development of the British colonies

Answer: d) A British statesman who played a role in the development of the British colonies

Explanation: The Duke of Bedford was a British statesman who played a significant role in the development of the British colonies. The town of Bedford was initially named in his honor.

30. A City’s Growth: What was the estimated value of ships and outfits in the national whale fishery in 1841, reflecting the scale of New Bedford’s whaling industry?

  • a) $5,151,316
  • b) $10,120,000
  • c) $15,120,000
  • d) $20,120,000

Answer: d) $20,120,000

Explanation: In 1841, the estimated value of ships and outfits in the national whale fishery was $20,120,000, illustrating the immense economic impact of the whaling industry.

31. A City’s Economy: New Bedford’s whaling industry generated substantial wealth. What were the estimated annual proceeds to the owners in the whale fishery in 1841?

  • a) $2,151,316
  • b) $3,151,316
  • c) $4,151,316
  • d) $5,151,316

Answer: d) $5,151,316

Explanation: In 1841, the annual proceeds to the owners in the whale fishery, excluding interest and insurance charges, were estimated at $5,151,316.

32. A City’s History: What was “Clark’s Point,” a location in early New Bedford, known for?

  • a) A bustling harbor where whaling ships docked
  • b) A prominent shipbuilding yard
  • c) A place where the city’s first textile mill was built
  • d) The location of the almshouse

Answer: d) The location of the almshouse

Explanation: Clark’s Point was a point of land where the almshouse, a facility for the poor and needy, was located.

33. A City’s Development: What is “Padanaram,” a village mentioned in early New Bedford’s history?

  • a) A neighboring town that later merged with New Bedford
  • b) A village in Dartmouth, Massachusetts, across the Acushnet River
  • c) A small community within New Bedford known for its fishing industry
  • d) A historic landmark that served as a lookout point during the Revolutionary War

Answer: b) A village in Dartmouth, Massachusetts, across the Acushnet River

Explanation: Padanaram was a village in Dartmouth, Massachusetts, located on the west side of the Acushnet River.

34. A City’s Heritage: New Bedford’s whaling industry has left behind lasting traditions. What is a “whaleboat,” a vessel essential to whaling?

  • a) A type of ship used for transporting whale oil
  • b) A small boat specifically designed for whaling
  • c) A vessel used for navigating treacherous waters
  • d) A ship that was used for capturing whales

Answer: b) A small boat specifically designed for whaling

Explanation: A whaleboat was a small, agile boat designed for whaling, equipped for hunting, capturing, and securing whales.

35. A City’s History: New Bedford faced numerous challenges throughout its history. What was the Dudley Davenport Fire, a devastating fire in 1848?

  • a) A fire that destroyed a large whaling ship
  • b) A fire that burned down a historic theater
  • c) A fire that ravaged a major textile mill
  • d) A fire that devastated a carpenter shop

Answer: d) A fire that devastated a carpenter shop

Explanation: The Dudley Davenport Fire, a major fire in 1848, destroyed a large carpenter shop.

36. A City’s Resilience: What was the “Liberty Hall” Fire, a fire that occurred in 1854, known for?

  • a) It destroyed a building used for lectures and political meetings
  • b) It burned down a major commercial district in the city
  • c) It ravaged a large shipyard on the waterfront
  • d) It destroyed a prominent church building

Answer: a) It destroyed a building used for lectures and political meetings

Explanation: The “Liberty Hall” Fire in 1854 destroyed a historic building used for lectures, political meetings, and entertainment.

37. A City’s History: What was the “Howland Street” Riot, a riot that occurred in 1856, a reflection of?

  • a) A labor dispute between textile mill workers and management
  • b) A conflict between different ethnic groups in the city
  • c) A protest against the city’s government
  • d) A dispute over the ownership of a building on Howland Street

Answer: d) A dispute over the ownership of a building on Howland Street

Explanation: The “Howland Street” Riot in 1856 was caused by a dispute over the ownership of a building on Howland Street.

38. A City’s History: New Bedford faced a significant fire in 1859. What was the “Great Fire” of 1859, the largest in the city’s history, known for?

  • a) It destroyed a large number of whaling ships
  • b) It burned down a major textile mill
  • c) It destroyed buildings, ships, and cargoes of oil
  • d) It ravaged a commercial district on the waterfront

Answer: c) It destroyed buildings, ships, and cargoes of oil

Explanation: The “Great Fire” of 1859, the most devastating fire in New Bedford’s history, destroyed buildings, ships, and cargoes of oil, resulting in a significant loss of property.

39. A City’s History: What is “Horse Neck,” a peninsula mentioned in early New Bedford’s history, known for?

  • a) A place where the first settlement in New Bedford was established
  • b) A location where the city’s first textile mill was built
  • c) A site where a major battle of the Revolutionary War took place
  • d) A farm owned by Timothy Tallman

Answer: d) A farm owned by Timothy Tallman

Explanation: Horse Neck was a peninsula where Timothy Tallman’s farm was located, a significant piece of land in early New Bedford’s development.

40. A City’s History: What was the “Cumberland” Sinking, a naval event that involved a New Bedford officer?

  • a) The sinking of a whaling ship by a Confederate raider
  • b) The sinking of a Union warship by a Confederate ironclad
  • c) The sinking of a British ship during the Revolutionary War
  • d) The sinking of a merchant ship during a storm

Answer: b) The sinking of a Union warship by a Confederate ironclad

Explanation: Lieutenant William P. Randall of New Bedford was one of the officers on board the “Cumberland” when it was sunk by the Confederate ironclad “Merrimac” in 1862.

41. A City’s Legacy: New Bedford’s history is filled with remarkable individuals. What did Captain George Fred Tilton do in 1898, showcasing his bravery and resilience?

  • a) He rescued a whaling crew trapped in the Arctic
  • b) He led a daring expedition to the South Pole
  • c) He walked 3,000 miles across Alaska to reach civilization after his whaling fleet was trapped in the ice pack
  • d) He designed a new type of whaleboat that improved safety at sea

Answer: c) He walked 3,000 miles across Alaska to reach civilization after his whaling fleet was trapped in the ice pack

Explanation: Captain George Fred Tilton walked 3,000 miles across Alaska to reach civilization and deliver a message after his whaling fleet was trapped in the ice pack, a testament to his resilience and dedication.

42. A City’s History: What is “Smith Mills,” a village mentioned in early New Bedford’s history, known for?

  • a) A location where the city’s first textile mill was built
  • b) A village in Dartmouth, Massachusetts, across the Acushnet River
  • c) A community within New Bedford known for its fishing industry
  • d) A historic landmark that served as a lookout point during the Revolutionary War

Answer: a) A location where the city’s first textile mill was built

Explanation: Smith Mills was a village where the Kemptons had their mills, marking the beginning of textile manufacturing in New Bedford.

43. A City’s Transformation: What was the approximate tonnage of New Bedford in 1845, reflecting its status as a major shipping port?

  • a) 133,262
  • b) 183,262
  • c) 233,262
  • d) 283,262

Answer: c) 233,262

Explanation: In 1845, New Bedford registered a tonnage of 233,262, making it the fourth largest tonnage district in the United States.

44. A City’s History: What was the “Alabama” Claims, a legal battle that followed the Civil War?

  • a) Claims filed by New Bedford whalers against the Confederate government for the loss of ships
  • b) Claims filed by the Union government against the British government for supporting the Confederacy
  • c) Claims filed by Confederate prisoners of war against the Union government for mistreatment
  • d) Claims filed by the city of New Bedford against the federal government for economic damages during the war

Answer: a) Claims filed by New Bedford whalers against the Confederate government for the loss of ships

Explanation: The “Alabama” Claims were a legal battle that followed the Civil War, involving claims filed by New Bedford whalers against the Confederate government for losses incurred due to Confederate cruisers like the “Alabama.”

45. A City’s History: What was the “Cold Day” of 1821 known for?

  • a) A severe blizzard that blanketed the city in snow
  • b) A record-breaking low temperature in New Bedford
  • c) A major fire that ravaged the city’s waterfront
  • d) A storm that destroyed the Bedford-Fairhaven bridge

Answer: b) A record-breaking low temperature in New Bedford

Explanation: The “Cold Day” of 1821 was known for a record-breaking low temperature of 12 degrees below zero in New Bedford.

46. A City’s History: What was the “Dartmouth,” a ship built in New Bedford in 1767, known for?

  • a) It was the first ship to fly the American flag in British waters
  • b) It was one of the ships boarded by the “Tea Party” in Boston Harbor
  • c) It was a whaling ship that made a record-breaking catch of sperm oil
  • d) It was a merchant ship that transported goods between New Bedford and Europe

Answer: b) It was one of the ships boarded by the “Tea Party” in Boston Harbor

Explanation: The “Dartmouth,” built in New Bedford in 1767, was one of the tea ships boarded by the “Tea Party” in Boston Harbor, a significant event in American history.

47. A City’s History: What is “Try House,” a structure that played a role in New Bedford’s whaling industry?

  • a) A building where whaling equipment was stored
  • b) A place where captured whales were weighed and measured
  • c) A structure used for processing whale blubber into oil
  • d) A ship that was specially designed for hunting whales

Answer: c) A structure used for processing whale blubber into oil

Explanation: A “try house” was a structure used for processing whale blubber into oil, an essential step in the whaling industry.

48. A City’s History: What is “Sconticut Neck,” a peninsula mentioned in early New Bedford’s history, known for?

  • a) A historic shipyard that built many whaling ships
  • b) A location where the first textile mill was built
  • c) A park that is popular with local residents
  • d) A site where a major battle of the Revolutionary War took place

Answer: c) A park that is popular with local residents

Explanation: Sconticut Neck is a peninsula on the east side of the Acushnet River that is now a park, offering recreational opportunities to local residents.

49. A City’s History: What is “Clark’s Point,” a location mentioned in early New Bedford’s history, known for?

  • a) A bustling harbor where whaling ships docked
  • b) A prominent shipbuilding yard
  • c) A place where the city’s first textile mill was built
  • d) The location of the almshouse

Answer: d) The location of the almshouse

Explanation: Clark’s Point was a point of land where the almshouse, a facility for the poor and needy, was located.

50. A City’s History: What is “Padanaram,” a village mentioned in early New Bedford’s history?

  • a) A neighboring town that later merged with New Bedford
  • b) A village in Dartmouth, Massachusetts, across the Acushnet River
  • c) A small community within New Bedford known for its fishing industry
  • d) A historic landmark that served as a lookout point during the Revolutionary War

Answer: b) A village in Dartmouth, Massachusetts, across the Acushnet River

Explanation: Padanaram was a village in Dartmouth, Massachusetts, located on the west side of the Acushnet River.

51. A City’s History: What is “Horse Neck,” a peninsula mentioned in early New Bedford’s history, known for?

  • a) A place where the first settlement in New Bedford was established
  • b) A location where the city’s first textile mill was built
  • c) A site where a major battle of the Revolutionary War took place
  • d) A farm owned by Timothy Tallman

Answer: d) A farm owned by Timothy Tallman

Explanation: Horse Neck was a peninsula where Timothy Tallman’s farm was located, a significant piece of land in early New Bedford’s development.

52. A City’s Industry: What was the approximate tonnage of New Bedford in 1845, reflecting its status as a major shipping port?

  • a) 133,262
  • b) 183,262
  • c) 233,262
  • d) 283,262

Answer: c) 233,262

Explanation: In 1845, New Bedford registered a tonnage of 233,262, making it the fourth largest tonnage district in the United States.

53. A City’s History: What was the “Alabama” Claims, a legal battle that followed the Civil War?

  • a) Claims filed by New Bedford whalers against the Confederate government for the loss of ships
  • b) Claims filed by the Union government against the British government for supporting the Confederacy
  • c) Claims filed by Confederate prisoners of war against the Union government for mistreatment
  • d) Claims filed by the city of New Bedford against the federal government for economic damages during the war

Answer: a) Claims filed by New Bedford whalers against the Confederate government for the loss of ships

Explanation: The “Alabama” Claims were a legal battle that followed the Civil War, involving claims filed by New Bedford whalers against the Confederate government for losses incurred due to Confederate cruisers like the “Alabama.”

54. A City’s History: What was the “Cold Day” of 1821 known for?

  • a) A severe blizzard that blanketed the city in snow
  • b) A record-breaking low temperature in New Bedford
  • c) A major fire that ravaged the city’s waterfront
  • d) A storm that destroyed the Bedford-Fairhaven bridge

Answer: b) A record-breaking low temperature in New Bedford

Explanation: The “Cold Day” of 1821 was known for a record-breaking low temperature of 12 degrees below zero in New Bedford.

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