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Did you know that a personalized product recommendation is nearly 4x more likely to sell over a generic one? (see Salesforce’ study on this) Now think about how much time and money you spend getting people to come to your website in the first place – wouldn’t you want your site to convert 4 times as many of those people into making a purchase? I know I would.

It used to be that any sort of website personalization was super expensive and required engineers to write algorithms. Now you can do it really quickly by using interactivity available right out of box with interact.

I want to show you how this works using an example from a website I’m obsessed with, BethKirby.com. Beth is a visual storyteller and instagram marketing coach.

When you visit Beth’s site, she has a quiz titled “Which Instagram Hashtag Are You?” part-way down the home page and this is the invite to begin your personalized “choose your own adventure” type of journey through Beth’s website.

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Once you begin the quiz it quickly begins asking you questions about your style and what you like to do. This is where the real work happens, because as you are answering these questions you are being filtered based on what you choose (more on how quiz scoring works). The questions also draw you into the site because the more you feel like the owner of the site knows you the more it becomes a personal journey rather than being sold something.

Typically quizzes have about 7 questions, which takes 2 minutes to respond to, this is enough time to really make the site personal but any longer and our attention spans would falter.

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After the questions of the quiz there is an opportunity to enter an email in order to receive more detailed help based on how you answered the questions. There is pushback on this part because it might seem like a bit of a trap to ask people this after the questions. But if you think about it, in a retail experience where you sell products there is often a push for joining an email list that happens after you’ve had a conversation with a retail associate, not before. It doesn’t really make sense to ask people for an email before a quiz, and while asking for it after will drive some people away, there is a clear option to abandon the quiz at this point, no one is being forced to enter information.

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After the email step is where the website personalization begins. In this case with Beth’s quiz you are being shown which Instagram hashtag you are, but it’s so much more than that. Based on which hashtag she recommends for you there is a whole string of personalized advice for how to implement a better Instagram strategy.

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The site goes on and on with information that is just for me based on my type.

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I’m even given actionable next steps I can follow to grow my brand using Instagram. And there is an additional reference to my email inbox where Beth will be sending even more information over the coming days and weeks about how I can use my unique style to my advantage.

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How would I personalize my website using the same method as Beth?

What Beth has set up looks amazing, but the second you start planning how to do it yourself there will be a lot of questions that come up, it’s not as easy as it looks if I’m being perfectly honest. Here’s my take on how to approach personalizing your website without it being a massive undertaking.

Step 1: Identify why people come to your site (what question are they trying to answer?”

People come to you for a reason. If you’re a life coach they’re looking for purpose in life, if you’re a jewelry store they’re looking for jewelry that will look good on them, if you’re a University they’re looking for the education that will help them reach their goals.

The keyword in each of those scenarios is “their” which is also “my” which means that people come to your site looking for what will help them individually, and could really care less about what your company does as a whole and all that.

Think about why people come to you, it’s probably to solve something for themselves.

Step 2: Craft a quiz title that promises to answer that question

Once you know what the question is, whether it’s purpose, jewelry style, or education type – make a quiz that will help them as an individual to find the right answer. So “What’s Your True Purpose?” “What’s The Right Jewelry Style For You?” “What’s The Right Education For Your Life?.” Each of these answers the most important question the respective site visitors have when they are arriving.

If you’re struggling on this step, the easiest way to think about it is how you can make the quiz title fit into a “What (Blank) is Best For You?” or “What’s Your (Blank)?” format, where the blank is the question that’s trying to be answered.

In simplest terms what you’re doing is promising to answer the most important question people have using your site as the basis.

Step 3: Write questions that help you identify what the answer to the question is

As the expert in your field, you know how to guide people towards the right solution based on their needs and personal situation. These are probably the types of questions you ask people all the time when they ask you what the best solution is for their lives. You ask them about what they like and don’t like, how they live their life, where they live, what their habits are like, and then you provide recommendations to them based on what they tell you.

That’s exactly how you craft your quiz questions. Ask the types of things that will help you help the customer.

Step 4: Ask for an email address so you can follow up with people who get the question answered and provide more details to them

The best way to do this is to say “Enter your email to see what (blank) is right for you” “and get personalized advice on how to use your unique (blank) style to its fullest potential” where both of the blanks are related to the main question this whole quiz is trying to answer. Putting the email capture in context like that will change the conversation because now people are opting in to get something they want, not something that you want as the website owner.

Step 5: Direct people to page on your site that answers the big question after they’ve gone through the quiz

You can set these up as landing pages on your site, or make them blog posts or pages on your site. With the interact quiz maker software, you can set up the redirects at the end of the quiz to go to any URL, so wherever you want to set up this personalized place for each quiz taker will work. You know how we started off this article by saying that personalized product recommendations sell 4x more products over generic ones? These pages are your opportunity to make those sales.

Whatever it is that you offer, this is the opportunity to make the pitch, and put it all in the context of who this individual is that is on your site. At this point you really can’t be too talkative. You are basically talking about the person who took the quiz, and people can hear things about themselves all day without getting bored, so you get to go on with a fully interested audience.

Beth’s personalized pages are 5-6 pages long, and I recommend providing a lot of detail when you get to this part.

Step 6: Craft an email sequence that continues to help answer the big question in a drip series

While people will be interested in the moment, there is a limited amount of reading anyone can do, and we all have a lot going on. The best way to keep the conversation going and to make additional sales after the fact, is to continue sending out helpful, personalized information to people by email so that you can give more and more valuable advice.

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Personalized recommendations sell 4 times as many products. You can set up website personalization in an afternoon using a quiz. If you’re interested in seeing more about how this works, everything referenced in this article, including Beth’s quiz, was set up using interact quiz maker.


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