Scholastic Ontology Quiz Questions and Answers

How do you feel about the idea of a Prime Mover as the ultimate cause of motion and change?

  • It’s a logical explanation, but I’m not sure how to actually experience it.
  • It sounds like a cool story, but I’m not sure if it’s actually true.
  • I think it’s important to have a First Cause, even if we can’t fully understand it.
  • It’s a complex concept, but I’m fascinated by the idea of a being who sets everything in motion.

What is the trickiest part about grasping the difference between essence and existence?

  • Trying to understand how something can have a potential nature without actually existing.
  • Figuring out what it means to be “real” in the sense of existence.
  • Coming up with examples that clearly demonstrate the distinction between the two.
  • Accepting that essence and existence are really distinct in created beings, but identical in God.

How comfortable are you with the idea that possible essences have their primary ideal being in the Divine Intellect?

  • It’s an interesting thought, but I’m not sure I can fully comprehend it.
  • It seems like a very abstract concept, but it makes sense in a way.
  • I’m comfortable with it, but I also think it’s a concept that needs to be further explored.
  • It’s an idea that I find deeply unsettling, as it implies a mind that is superior to my own.

What’s your favorite aspect of the concept of change as a transition from potentiality to actuality?

  • It explains how things develop and evolve over time.
  • It helps me understand the nature of time and how it unfolds.
  • It gives me a sense of hope that things can always change for the better.
  • It’s a complex idea, but I find it to be very satisfying intellectually.

How often do you think about the distinction between real being and logical being?

  • I don’t think about it that often, but I find it fascinating when it comes up.
  • I often think about this distinction, as it helps me to understand the nature of thought.
  • I don’t think about it that much, but I find the idea of logical being to be quite strange.
  • I think about it frequently, as it helps me to understand the limitations of human knowledge.

What do you think you need to reach a deeper understanding of the principle of individuation?

  • More time to study and reflect on the concept.
  • More concrete examples that illustrate the difference between individuals.
  • More knowledge about the nature of matter and its relationship to form.
  • More access to the works of philosophers who have explored this topic.

How prepared are you for a philosophical debate about the reality of accidents?

  • I’m not really prepared to argue about it, but I’m open to learning more.
  • I’m pretty confident in my understanding of the issue, and I’m ready to debate.
  • I’m a little hesitant to engage in this debate, as it seems like it could get very complex.
  • I’m excited to discuss this topic, as it’s something I’ve been thinking about for a while.

How do you handle the challenges of reconciling Scholastic metaphysics with modern scientific discoveries?

  • I try to find common ground between the two, but it’s not always easy.
  • I believe that Scholastic metaphysics can still be relevant in the modern world.
  • I find it challenging to reconcile the two, but I’m willing to try.
  • I think that modern science has proven that Scholastic metaphysics is outdated.

What comes to mind when you think about the concept of being as a transcendental notion?

  • It’s something that’s always present but never fully grasped.
  • It’s a vast and mysterious concept that’s hard to define.
  • It’s something that transcends all categories and classifications.
  • It’s something that’s beyond human comprehension.

What makes you most nervous about trying to define “being” in all its different modes?

  • The fear of making a mistake and getting it wrong.
  • The possibility of not being able to capture the full complexity of the concept.
  • The potential for it to lead to endless philosophical debates.
  • The realization that “being” is ultimately a mystery that may never be fully understood.

What’s your go-to resource for information on Scholastic metaphysics?

  • Books by classic philosophers like Aquinas and Aristotle.
  • Articles and websites that explain the concepts in accessible language.
  • Podcasts and lectures by modern scholars who specialize in this field.
  • My own personal reflections and meditations on the subject.

What is your biggest challenge right now when it comes to understanding the relationship between substance and accident?

  • Trying to find a balance between the two concepts without reducing one to the other.
  • Figuring out how accidents can be real without being independent of substance.
  • Understanding how accidents can affect substance without changing its essence.
  • Grasping the fact that substance is the foundation of reality, while accidents are dependent on it.

When you think about the concept of “being” what are you most concerned about?

  • The possibility of its being reduced to a purely abstract concept.
  • The idea that it’s something that can’t be fully understood by human beings.
  • The potential for it to be used to justify harmful or oppressive ideologies.
  • The realization that “being” is ultimately a mystery that may never be fully understood.

How would you describe your relationship to the study of Scholastic metaphysics?

  • I’m a curious observer, intrigued by its concepts but not fully committed to it.
  • I’m a dedicated student, eager to learn more and explore its depths.
  • I’m a passionate advocate, convinced of its importance and relevance in today’s world.
  • I’m a skeptical critic, questioning its assumptions and seeking more evidence to support its claims.

Which of the following best describes your current level of expertise in Scholastic ontology?

  • I’m a beginner, just starting to learn about the basics.
  • I’m an intermediate student, familiar with the main concepts and ideas.
  • I’m an advanced scholar, able to engage in critical analysis and debate.
  • I’m a master of the subject, with a deep understanding of its complexities and implications.

How prepared are you for a scenario where someone challenges your understanding of the nature of change?

  • I’m not really prepared to defend my views, but I’m open to learning more.
  • I’m pretty confident in my understanding of the issue, and I’m ready to argue my case.
  • I’m a little hesitant to engage in this discussion, as it seems like it could get very complex.
  • I’m excited to engage in this dialogue, as it’s something I’ve been thinking about for a while.

Do you have a go-to explanation for the relationship between potential being and actual being?

  • I’m not sure if I have one, but I’m open to finding one that makes sense.
  • I like to use the example of a seed and a tree.
  • I find the concept of a Prime Mover to be helpful in understanding this relationship.
  • I think it’s important to distinguish between intrinsic and extrinsic possibility in this context.

What’s your first response when someone asks you “What is being?”

  • I tell them that it’s a complex question with no easy answer.
  • I ask them to define what they mean by “being.”
  • I start to explain the different modes of being.
  • I say that “being” is the most fundamental concept in metaphysics.

What do you think is missing in your quest to understand the true nature of “being”?

  • More time to study and reflect on the concept.
  • More access to the works of classic philosophers like Aquinas and Aristotle.
  • More concrete examples that illustrate the different modes of being.
  • A deeper understanding of the relationship between God and creation.

Which of the following do you notice yourself worrying about on a day-to-day basis?

  • Not being able to understand the true nature of reality.
  • Making mistakes in my reasoning about metaphysical concepts.
  • Not being able to fully grasp the complexity of the universe.
  • Feeling overwhelmed by the vastness of the subject matter.

How connected do you feel to the idea of “being” as a universal concept?

  • I feel a sense of awe and wonder at its vastness and mystery.
  • I feel a sense of connection to something larger than myself.
  • I feel a sense of responsibility to explore its meaning and implications.
  • I feel a sense of frustration at not being able to fully understand it.

What is your strongest argument for the real distinction between essence and existence?

  • It’s the only explanation that can account for the existence of contingent beings.
  • It’s the most logical way to understand the difference between God and creation.
  • It’s the only way to explain how something can have a potential nature without actually existing.
  • It’s the only way to explain how something can be possible without being actual.

How confident are you in your ability to explain the concept of “being” to someone who has never heard of it before?

  • I’m not very confident, as it’s a difficult concept to explain.
  • I’m moderately confident, as I’ve studied the subject for some time.
  • I’m very confident, as I have a deep understanding of the concept.
  • I’m extremely confident, as I’ve dedicated my life to understanding “being.”

How do you handle the situation when someone tries to dismiss Scholastic metaphysics as outdated and irrelevant?

  • I try to engage with their concerns and explain why I think it’s still relevant.
  • I calmly disagree and explain why I believe it’s still important today.
  • I get frustrated and try to prove them wrong.
  • I disengage from the conversation and avoid further discussion.

What is your current biggest challenge related to Scholastic ontology?

  • Understanding the relationship between God and creation.
  • Reconciling Scholastic metaphysics with modern scientific discoveries.
  • Explaining the concept of “being” to others in a way that they can understand.
  • Finding the time and resources to continue my study of the subject.

What’s the first thing that comes to mind when you think about the problem of individuation?

  • The mystery of how individual beings come to be distinct from one another.
  • The challenge of understanding how individuals can be both unique and part of a larger whole.
  • The possibility that individuals are not truly distinct but rather interconnected.
  • The realization that the problem of individuation is a complex philosophical puzzle that may never be fully solved.

How do you feel about the idea that the universe is constantly changing and evolving?

  • It’s a fascinating idea, but I’m not sure I fully understand it.
  • It’s a concept that fills me with both excitement and anxiety.
  • It’s a truth that I find both comforting and unsettling.
  • It’s an idea that I find both inspiring and challenging.

Which of the following is most likely to frustrate you?

  • Trying to explain metaphysical concepts to people who don’t understand them.
  • Not being able to find satisfactory answers to philosophical questions.
  • The realization that some questions may never have definitive answers.
  • Feeling like I’m not making progress in my understanding of Scholastic ontology.

How do you determine your understanding of a particular metaphysical concept?

  • By reading the works of classic philosophers and comparing their interpretations.
  • By reflecting on my own experiences and trying to find connections to the concepts.
  • By engaging in philosophical discussions with others and comparing notes.
  • By combining all of the above methods.

Are your thoughts on Scholastic metaphysics consistently achieving their assigned task?

  • My thoughts are constantly evolving and changing, so I’m not sure if they’re achieving a specific task.
  • I think my thoughts are moving in the right direction, but I still have a lot to learn.
  • I’m confident that my thoughts are on track, but I’m always looking for new insights.
  • I’m constantly seeking new information and perspectives to help me refine my thoughts.

How do you manage the complexity of Scholastic ontology?

  • I break down complex concepts into smaller, more manageable parts.
  • I use visual aids and diagrams to help me understand the relationships between concepts.
  • I engage in philosophical discussions with others to help me clarify my thinking.
  • I combine all of the above methods to manage the complexity of the subject matter.

What’s your idea of a perfect world where the principles of Scholastic ontology are fully realized?

  • A world where everyone understands the true nature of reality.
  • A world where people live in harmony with each other and with nature.
  • A world where knowledge and wisdom are highly valued.
  • A world where everyone strives for excellence in all aspects of life.

If you could choose any attribute of “being” to have as your own, which one would you choose and why?

  • I would choose to be “actual” because it means being fully realized and complete.
  • I would choose to be “potential” because it means having the capacity for growth and change.
  • I would choose to be “one” because it means being united with something larger than myself.
  • I would choose to be “good” because it means being in harmony with the natural order of things.

Tell us a little about your view of the relationship between substance and accident?

  • I believe that substance is the foundation of reality, while accidents are dependent on it.
  • I think that substance and accident are both essential components of reality, and they can’t be separated.
  • I’m not sure if substance and accident are truly distinct, or if they’re just different ways of looking at the same thing.
  • I’m still exploring this relationship, and I’m not sure what I believe yet.

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