Ep. 38

Establishing Clear Goals to Balance Two Businesses with Nadalie Bardo

Four years ago, Nadalie Bardo quit her 9-5 job without a plan in place and serious negative dollars in the bank. Nadalie had spent most of her 20’s in University and earned her Master’s in International Development Studies—but when she landed a job in PR, she found herself incredibly underwhelmed and unhappy with the day-to-day work.

Nadalie didn’t want to be trapped spending her days speaking in other people’s voices, so she took action. She bet on herself and created a career that not only maximizes her potential, but helps others do the same.  Pursuing life with confidence and slaying goals—in business, and life.

Nadalie’s website: https://nadaliebardo.com/

Jessmyn:
All right. Hi, everyone. Welcome back to Interact’s Creator Stories Podcast. I’m Jessmyn Solana. With me today, I have Nadalie Bardo. Hi, Nadalie. How are you?

Nadalie:
I am so great. Thanks for having me on.

Jessmyn:
Of course. Thanks for coming on. So, you have a couple of businesses right now, and one of them is itsallyouboo.com and nadaliebardo.com. Do you want to go ahead and introduce yourself a little bit and your business? And then take us back to the beginning and tell us how you got here to where you are today.

Nadalie:
Awesome. Yeah, my first site that I started is itsallyouboo.com. It’s a blog. I like to say that I’m here to help you slay your goal so you can live your dream life with confidence and action. So all the content that I curate and also create on that site is really all about just helping us to take action in our lives. I feel so many of us, we get trapped in either dream mode or even goal setting mode, but not actually getting to the movements and the actions that we need to take. So, that site is completely dedicated to that, and that’s how we met through that business. Part of how I grew my site, it’s been four years now, was with Pinterest. So because of that, a lot of people over the years have been like, “Okay. Can you show us how to use Pinterest?” So then I’m like, “All right.” So then I started the second site, nadaliebardo.com, where I focus on teaching Pinterest marketing. I have created courses and templates. I just launched a YouTube channel for that. So yeah, that’s me.

Jessmyn:
That’s awesome. I know. I remember when we first reached out and I think I also found you on Pinterest, because that’s how I used to search for partners at the time. So, that’s really awesome that you have both, but I guess I have a couple of questions based off of that. So first off, just how did you get started in general? And then also, when did you decide to… What was it that you were like, “Okay, let me make this into a second business,” and start that second thing rather than just tying it into what you were already doing?

Nadalie:
Yeah. Okay. So I guess it’s been four, almost five years now. What happened was basically I spent all my 20s in university. I got my master’s. I got a postgraduate diploma. I just felt like every job, it was like, “You need more qualifications.” And then I finally got a real job and I was like, “Oh, really? This is it? Okay.” I was so underwhelmed and was really unhappy. I was in PR. I was spending a lot of time talking in other people’s voices, like bank testimonials and talking about products and not being able to be myself. Through circumstances, I had quit that job to get another job, where I felt like I would be giving back and being to my full potential. Ended up getting fired a day before my three months probation was up. So then I qualified for unemployment insurance and I was like, “Okay. You know what, I’m done with jobs.” Because the way I see it is that if someone can just can me because they don’t like me without reason, there’s just no security in that.
So, I decided, you know what… I remember literally driving home and I was like, “Okay, I’m done. I’m going to bet on myself because I know what I’m capable of.” So I spent that year just researching, listening to podcasts, reading books. I discovered there’s this whole underground society of people just living in their houses, doing their own thing. I was like, “What?” So basically I started the blog. It’s All You Boo came about through some conversations I had had with friends, asking them like, “Do you feel happy? Do you feel successful?” My answer was always like, “It’s all you boo.” Googled it, nobody used that and I was like, “All right. That’s my site.”

Jessmyn:
That’s awesome.

Nadalie:
So yeah, that was the journey of that. Deciding to start a second site, so this has always been this kind of like push and pull with myself. Do I stick to It’s All You Boo, where I’m all about helping people slay their goals? I have the planner. I have the courses. That’s its own thing, but where does this other pull to teach people hard skill, like teaching people the graphic design, the Pinterest marketing, the blogging? Because I think when you start out on this journey, along the way you pick up all these skills that other people really want to learn. So yeah, at the end of the day, it was just a choice to… Because I do feel like even though, yeah, they’re complimentary, I’m going after different people for both, right?
The It’s All You Boo, I just recently surveyed my list, they’re mostly just everyday people who are students, employees, moms. I realized that with Nadalie Bardo, I am branding myself as your Pinterest coach, right? So to anybody who has a brand, a business or a blog and wants to discover Pinterest and level up their game with Pinterest, that’s who I want to be for them. It’s connected because to me, It’s All You Boo is my resume. It’s like, “Okay. What do you know about Pinterest?” And like, “Hey, you go look at my site. You can look at my profile.” I do think a lot of the success I’ve had is because I made that choice on Pinterest, like you found me. I’m convinced I got a book deal because of Pinterest. All these, it’s just the way of being discovered and people should be on there.

Jessmyn:
I love that. So, my question from there is what is it like… I don’t want to use the word juggling because it’s not. I feel like it has a negative connotation, but-

Nadalie:
What’s it like being squished by two businesses at the same time?

Jessmyn:
Yeah. What’s it like balancing, is the better word, I should say, both of those businesses? You have to pivot from… It sounds like they’re totally different or they’re two different audiences. There might be people out there who are like, “Yeah, I also have two things,” and maybe they’re deciding on doing both, one or the other and so on. So how do you do that?

Nadalie:
Yeah. I feel like we can be pressured as… I’m assuming a lot of your listeners, they’re multitalented people. We’re multi-passionate. There isn’t just one thing we want to do. We want to do it all, right? I think that’s very much the personality of an entrepreneur. I have just come to the point where I’m going to stop feeling guilty about being unable to decide, and I’m not going to decide. I’ve been trying to choose for four years and I don’t think I am going to be able to. So even if it means I have to go slower on both, I’m fine with that because I know the direction I’m going in.
I guess in terms of balancing, I made a conscious decision that for 2021, I would always choose the Nadalie Bardo site over the It’s All You Boo site because I’ve been prioritizing It’s All You Boo last year. I made decisions that put things off. I’m not saying I regret those decisions, but I feel like the site is good. It’s at this point where even if, okay, I’m behind on scheduling blog posts, at the end of the day, there’s over 300 blog posts on there. I’ve got over 10,000 subscribers. It’s good. I’m making passive sales. If I am late with that, it’s not the end of the world. So I think in terms of balance, I don’t think there’s ever going to be a clear balance. One is always… I talk about this in my book, Conquer Procrastination, where we talk about priorities. That in itself is not a word that makes sense. You have a priority, singular, right? You can’t have multiple priorities. It doesn’t hold up with a definition of what the word is, right?
So I think with any other part of your life, and we’re talking work-life balance, school-life balance, at any given time, you have to decide what side that balance or that weight is going to go towards. It’s okay if it flips back and forth. I know some other people who have multiple businesses, they do something like say, January is business one, February’s business two, March is business one, or dividing your schedule by weeks, or even by days. You can say, “Mornings I work on this. Afternoons I work on that.” If you’re in the U.S. right now, the Senate is doing something similar with the, “Each Monday [inaudible 00:09:29] business of the day.” So I think you have to decide how you’re going to divide your time and just stick with it and realize that sometimes the weight is going to go in one direction and that’s okay, I think if you have multiple businesses. It’s All You Boo is like a teenager and the other one is still a toddler. So, it’s choosing. One is going to need more attention, right?

Jessmyn:
Yeah. Yeah. That’s interesting that you put it that way, and I like that figuring out like, “Okay. This is my priority for either this quarter or this month.” That leads me to my next question. I know that you have a planner that you created called Slay Your Goals. I mean, that’s what It’s All You Boo is about. So, do you use those same practices in there in how you balance the two businesses?

Nadalie:
Yeah, definitely. When I created that planner, it was all the worksheets. These are things I was doing with myself, like just scribbling on scrap paper or trying to figure myself out, because in the beginning, I didn’t know what I wanted to do. I was a photographer. I was designing people’s websites. I was doing all these different things and I couldn’t really choose a pathway. So in my planner, one of the things I say is like, “Choose your number one goal.” Right? For me, my number one goal is to build Nadalie Bardo. That is my number one goal right now. So I try and live by these principles that the planner teaches as well. For myself, I divided up the year. There are four quarters. I have the summer for It’s All You Boo because I know that’s when things are slower so I don’t feel as much pressure, but… Yeah. So it’s like half Nadalie Bardo. And then another big project I have is launching the physical planner, which is being developed right now, so I’m super excited about that.

Jessmyn:
Wow. That’s awesome. Oh, that’s good. That’s good. You said that you divide it into four quarters. How do you really decide like, “Okay. This is what I’m going to focus on this year”? Is there a strategy to that or is it really just based on that business’s needs? And what does that look like?

Nadalie:
So for me, I take things into account, like the timing of the year. When is it more important for me to be doing one thing than the other? So for example, if you’re a personal development blogger or you’re in that space, the last quarter of the year is the most important because that’s when everyone is actually interested in… They’re starting to think about goals. They’re starting to think about New Year’s resolutions. So looking at what I can do in 12 months, I know that those months are going to be dedicated to the It’s All You Boo site, because that’s when I get the majority of my traffic and make the most sales. So it makes the most sense to put my energy into it then. Also, with the holidays, people aren’t really thinking about, “Okay. I need to start Pinterest marketing.” I think that’s kind of like beginning of the year. So that’s why this first quarter, I’m working on that.
So when deciding, I asked myself questions like, “Okay. What is the most important? What are those windows of time where it’ll be more easy to be successful or it’s more important for me to be successful at something at this time?” Thinking about things like, “What are you setting up?” So for example, starting the YouTube channel in January, I need to start early because if I want to get monetized by the summer, that’s something that’s like… It’s a long-term process, creating a couple of videos a week. So I think in terms of milestones, I think in terms of deadlines, when do you want something to be fully formed by? Okay. So then think backwards logically when do you need to start.
So a project, like creating a physical planner, for example, I know that it’s not going to launch probably until September, October, around that window, but I started working on it last December, hiring an artist, knowing that finding printing companies and distribution, especially during the times that we’re in right now is going to take months. So I think you have to take into account the milestones that you want to hit for yourself, but also those firm deadlines that you’ve set, whether externally or you set for yourself, and that’s how I plan. I know that it’s fluid and things always change. That’s just reality. Things always take longer than you think. That’s normal and it’s okay. But I think when you have the framework, you can then shift and make those changes. A plan is never final. A plan is living and breathing and it’s going to shift with you. As your goals change, you get more knowledge about how to do something.

Jessmyn:
That is what I was going to ask next. I was going to say like, so say you plan in the beginning, what do you do? I guess how do you overcome this if you’re a few months in and it’s not really going the way you want it to go and you’re like, “Okay. I either have to redo this whole thing or I need to shift, or I need to do something else”? What is that process like?

Nadalie:
How do I shift?

Jessmyn:
Yeah. And how do you work through that, where you’re like, “Oh, I thought this was going to go one way,” and it did not go that way at all?

Nadalie:
Yeah. I think goals changing and reality setting in is always going to happen. Anytime you start any project, even you start a business, you come in almost with rose-colored glasses thinking, “Everything is going to be so easy and dah, dah, dah.” And then you realize that, “Oh yeah, I guess not.” I think that as the type of people that your audience is, who’s listening, we’ve got to know how to pivot. We’ve got to know how to shift. We’ve got to know how to find a way through. I think that process is just not being stubborn. I think we can be stubborn like, “Oh no, I’m going to do it this way and nothing is going to make me change,” even though the signs are literally all around you. So I think you have to be humble and be willing to be wrong, be willing to have to change.
I think in those times, find solutions. You have to be creative. You have to be a creative thinker. If you, yourself, do not have solutions, then I think that’s when you lean on your community, like whoever is on your team. I don’t mean like on your payroll. I mean, who’s on your side? Who is in it with you? Do you belong to a mastermind? Do you have an accountability buddy? Do you have a coach? Do you know someone who knows more than you do? I think that it’s in those times where you have to go look outside of yourself and, or even just get googling. There’s so many answers out there. Hit up those Facebook groups. Hit up Reddit. See what people are saying. There’s people who I rely on when I’m not sure what I should do or how to get out of a situation, and I think we all need to find those people, build those relationships and those connections because we’re invaluable.

Jessmyn:
Yeah, I love that. I love that. I think I’ve done a few of these now. One of the biggest, I guess, common things that I’ve heard people say is having a community. I think that is super important and it’s really cool that it comes out in almost every episode. And so, I hope that goes to show that that really is something that you should invest your time in to find that out. Something that caught my ear when you were talking was an accountability buddy, and I really liked that a lot, because sometimes maybe you’re brand new. You don’t know if you’re ready to join like a whole mastermind. You don’t know how to build your community, but at least you can find somebody who’s going to be like, “Hey, I have similar goals to you.” How would you find someone like that? Or I guess how would you build that community?

Nadalie:
Honestly, when we’re talking about a mastermind, you don’t even have to join a paid one. You can start one. I belong to one with three other personal development bloggers. We’re not all in the same spot. We’re all on different spots of the same journey. So it’s very helpful to connect with them once a month. In terms of finding an accountability buddy, I’ve had mine for three years or so now. We talk every week. You got to be careful, for one. Maybe you can find one, if there’s an online course you’re taking. Maybe there are another student in that course and you have similar goals. You can even post in Facebook groups being like, “Hey guys, I’m Nadalie. I’m a personal development blogger from so-and-so. I’m hoping to find someone who can work with me to A, B, C, D. Are you interested? If so, let me know.” You can reach out and find people that way. Also, there’s this really great app called Supporti. It is the accountability app. So you can check it out. It’s available in the App Store. It’s literally an app that partners you with an accountability buddy.

Jessmyn:
Oh, that’s cool.

Nadalie:
It’s really great. It’s created by this amazing person I know, Brigitte. So yeah, check out her app. It’s called Supporti. If you can’t find someone in your network, because I know some people will say, “Oh, I don’t have anyone,” or “I feel all alone in this,” then I really encourage you to check out an app like that because it’s going to help you find someone. The thing that’s great about that app is you can stick with one person or you can rotate throughout the people in the app to find somebody who is a perfect fit for you, as opposed to you struggling on your own to find a partner. So, those are my tips, see your network.
I would even say don’t be like, “Okay. Today, I need to find an accountability buddy.” How about you try to make a friend? I think a lot of the times the people who I’ve connected with, it’s just sending a casual email about something. Hilariously, a lot of the people I’m friends with, it’s because they emailed me to let me know that someone was stealing my Pinterest pins and that I should report it. So I’d say half of the bloggers I know, it’s because of that. So Pinterest wins again. But yeah, just make a friend. And then if you guys get along, be like, “Hey, want to be my accountability partner?” Or check out that app too if you don’t want to go the long route.

Jessmyn:
Yeah. Yeah, if you don’t want to do a little extra work. No, I love that. I think that’s a good idea. It’s awesome that that’s something that’s there and it’s available. I remember earlier you said that you used to work in a nine-to-five. After the fact, when you were looking for a new job, you were like, “Actually, I don’t want to do this.” What that like when you were… Did you actually try looking for a job? Are you automatically like, “No, I want to start my own thing”? What was that like? A lot of our customer base, a lot of our listeners are people who are in that spot, where they have a full-time job and they have this as a side hustle or they have this dream to start their own thing. So, what was that like for you?

Nadalie:
Okay. So I, the type of person who I always had a side hustle. Even in high school, I was like doing people’s hair for money. When I lost my job, quit the job to get the new job and then lost a job, I already had a profitable side hustle as a photographer. So, in my mind, it’s like, “Okay. I’ll just be a full-time photographer.” But then I realized that I was not loving… I didn’t want to do that. So, that’s when I discovered blogging. So I think when you’re in that space… And I have a bunch of blog posts on my site about this, like things to consider before quitting your job. I think the number one is money. As much as I think there are other reasons you should follow your passion and live your dream life, I think at the end of the day, you’ve got bills to pay. You have rent. You probably have a family. I think you need to just get yourself into the position where you saved up enough. You’re giving yourself like six months to figure it out. Yeah, you’re going to have to cut back.
I think for myself, when I lost the job, I was in debt. I didn’t expect that to happen to me, right? So I had to crawl myself out of negative. I always say like, “Negative dollars in the bank account.” Right? So I think at the end of the day, you need to know what you can live with. Can you live with less? Can you live with the stress? Because it’s going to be stressful and it is going to be hard as hell to go from having a normal job, where you’re just getting paid to pretty much show up to work. Yeah, you’re working, but it’s not the same type of working. Let’s be real. When you work for yourself, you will never work harder in your life than when you work for yourself.
So I think you have to know what you can live with. Can you live with less? Can you live with the stress of not knowing if you have enough yet? I think if the answers are no, then you need to save up, cut back on your spending and save up a huge emergency fund because it’s going to take time. I know people love to say like, “Oh, I made so much money in my first month.” And I’m just like, “Yeah, this is your 10th business. Of course, you did. You didn’t just start for the first time.” So I think you can’t drink the Kool-Aid that it’s going to be so easy and that it’s going to be so quick. It’s totally possible though, right? I like to say I’m living proof of that, but it’s hard work and it takes time. So you got to know what you can live with, in terms of the emotional stress, the time commitments and the financial constraints, and wherever you just have that honest conversation with yourself.

Jessmyn:
Is there anything that you did in particular to push you through all that stress and helping you move forward like, “Yes, this is something that I want to keep doing,” rather than just saying like, “You know what, all right, let me just go back to finding another job,” just because it was easier? Like you said, it’s super hard work.

Nadalie:
Yeah, I think the thing that at least is comforting is that you can always go get a job, right? Jobs are out there. Even no matter how challenging the times are, if you’re skilled, you can get a job. So I think in that way, there’s been a few times where I’m like, “Oh, maybe I’ll just go get a job.” But at this point, I’m so far in. There is no turning back. So the only thing I have to say to you is that the longer you keep at it, the longer you won’t want to quit. It does get easier. You are super invested. There will be a point where there is no turning back for you, although you can always turn back. So, it’s kind of that thing. I decided I would never work for someone because… Unless it’s some amazing offer that I cannot refuse, but yeah, I don’t know.
I think you just have to know yourself in that sense of… What kept me going a lot of the times was the confidence and support of other people. So I’m bringing it back to that, having accountability. I remember in that first year, I’m sending text messages to friends, friends who have no idea what I’m talking about, by the way. I’d just be like, “Am I crazy?” Literally, so many people I messaged, “Am I nuts to think I can do this?” Just having someone to be like, “No, you’re not crazy. You can do this,” that goes a long way. So I think you just need someone. You need a yes person, a hype woman or man in your life that is going to be like, “Yes, you can do it.”

Jessmyn:
No, that is super important, especially having that support. I think a lot of times if you can’t find an accountability buddy, if you don’t know where to look like, at least look in Facebook groups or look in… I’ve seen people do it on Instagram too, and that’s cool. So there’s a ton of different ways that you can look for that, but I love that a lot. I think that’s cool. Nice. [crosstalk 00:26:36] So, I’m trying to think if I have any other questions based off of that. Oh, you’ve mentioned that you had book and you also said this to me earlier, too. Do you want to talk a little bit about that? What that process is like? Yeah, all about that.

Nadalie:
Yeah. You guys are watching the video. I guess you can see, it’s called Conquer Procrastination. It’s available wherever books are sold, including Amazon, Target, and Barnes & Noble. Yeah, writing a book is an interesting process. It’s a lot of work, of course. But I think like any goal, whatever the end product is, whether that’s a book or a product for your business, having an outline and a timeline are really crucial to the success and being able to get it done. So I had about six weeks to write it. So, that was intense. I’d say that the hardest part was not the writing. The hardest part was dedicating six weeks, basically two months of my life to just the book while trying to still manage everything else at the same time. So yeah, I think that timelines and outlines are the key to so many things.

Jessmyn:
Yeah, that’s wild. It’s like you have two businesses. You’re also trying to write a book and then you have this crunch deadline. So, what was that like as you were trying to figure all of that out?

Nadalie:
Yeah. So what I did was I had to get really committed to having some type of daily routine. I guess I’m not really that big of a routine type person. I don’t believe in alarm clocks. I just wake up when I want. Yeah, I do work like crazy, so that’s why I’m easy on myself when it comes to routines. But for this, I was like, “Oh God. Okay. I have to wake up earlier,” because I realized I was better writing before noon. So, I would get up early and try to get 1,200 words done every day, five days straight, then take two rest days, right? So, I got really rigid with my schedule because I knew that I had to fit more things in.
It’s kind of that whole, I don’t know if you’ve ever heard that saying, it’s like when you have less time is actually when you make the most of your time, right? When you have a lot of time to do something, you never really do anything at all. It’s not till there’s so much pressure that you find a way to fit everything in. So yeah, I created a better or really intense routine for myself to be able to handle it and stay sane, get everything done.

Jessmyn:
So what was that like going from a more lenient day-to-day to a more rigid routine that you weren’t really used to following, but you’ve had to all of a sudden implement to get this done in six weeks?

Nadalie:
Yeah, it was intense. So it was kind of like being in school again, which is like that was time where I had to be very intense. I don’t if anyone’s been to grad school, it’s insane. I’m reading a hundred pages a day and writing intense papers, three a week, right? So I think it was hard on me, I guess, emotionally, because I am the type of person who does what she feels like. Thankfully, I feel like working a lot. But I guess in terms of what do I want to do today, yes, there are timelines and deadlines.
But I think when you’re your own boss, there’s a lot of room to play around with when you do things. So usually, I have a list of things I need to do and I can decide, “Okay. I’ll do this today because I’m in the mood for Pinterest,” or “I’ll do this today because I’m in the mood for graphic design.” So, not having those options was a little bit intense for me. But yeah, I do think that having sometimes readjust schedules can help you almost go into hyperspace because you can complete more things faster. But I know for me personally, that’s not how I want to live every single day.

Jessmyn:
Yeah, it’s kind of wild. I recently started scheduling every… Every single task call goes on my calendar. Mostly I had to do that because with… I mean, we were already remote, but with the pandemic happening, it was crazy where it’s like you can’t leave your house. You can’t go out and do things. If you want to go relax and go out to dinner or something, you can’t do that. And so, for me, it was like I don’t know when work stops anymore. It was almost like, I was like, “Well, I’m going to be home all day. I’ll just do this whenever.” If that ends up being later in the day and taking a break earlier in the day, that’s fine. And so, at some point, I did have to start scheduling my whole day. But then sometimes I’ll be like, “Yeah, I really want to break right now instead of doing this for the next 30 minutes.” So, it’s back and forth, but I see what you mean in having-

Nadalie:
You get to know yourself. If you need a schedule, then give yourself a schedule. But if you’re the type of person where you can just write a few things down on a piece of paper and you’ll get them done by the end of the day, because you work from this. You go for a walk at 3:00. You eat dinner at 5:00. You then have a couple hours. To me, that’s more of the type of schedule I prefer to have, where there’s my morning, I get stuff done in the morning. I have lunch and I get some more things done. At 3:00, I go for a walk. Then I get a couple more hours done. Then it’s dinner and chill for a few hours. And then I start the night shift, which is what I call it, or shower and drink coffee. I’m like, “All right. Well, I did my night shift.” Because two businesses, I got to do it, right?
So I think you just got to decide if you’re the type of person where you can time block in a way, loosely time block like, “These are the blocks where I get work done,” or if you need to be very specific, but you just have to know yourself and be honest with what works for you.

Jessmyn:
Yeah, don’t try to force yourself. For a while, I was trying to force myself to wake up at 6:00 just to have time before work. And then at some point I was like, “It’s just not natural for me.” It’s like it’s not happening.

Nadalie:
Yeah, I am 4:00 AM. There was no miracle hour for me at 4:00 AM. I’m sorry. That is REM sleep.

Jessmyn:
Yeah, it’s rough. It’s rough. But I agree with that, know yourself. I mean, try it out. I think it’s important to try it out, but if it’s not working, don’t force it.

Nadalie:
Yeah.

Jessmyn:
Yeah. Nice. Well, that’s all I have in terms of questions. Do you have any other last minute things, recommendations, tips or anything like that?

Nadalie:
Oh, other than you guys are awesome.

Jessmyn:
Thank you. Thank you. So I do have a couple of last minute questions that just to end the thing. We’re doing this one a little bit different this time. So we thought it would be fun instead of the three things you don’t know, to do two truths and a lie. So, do you want to go ahead?

Nadalie:
Okay. I’ll give you three things. Okay. One, I’m Canadian. Two, I’ve been to every continent. Three, I already said something like this, let me see. Let me see. Will I lie or tell the truth? I don’t know. I’m addicted to creating freebies.

Jessmyn:
So which one is the lie?

Nadalie:
I have not been to every continent as yet, two more to go.

Jessmyn:
Oh, that’s so cool. You’re almost there. You’re almost there.

Nadalie:
It’s going to have to wait a little while.

Jessmyn:
I know. But what are the two that you haven’t been to?

Nadalie:
Well, I haven’t been to Antarctica. I don’t think many people have and I have not been to Asia.

Jessmyn:
Ah, wow. I guess when travel is safe or opens up again, where would you like to go next?

Nadalie:
Oh, next. Okay. Well, next in Asia or just next?

Jessmyn:
I guess both.

Nadalie:
Okay. So I want to be cliche or say I want to go to Bali. Next probably what I’ve been wanting to do is actually road trip from Vancouver Island, from Vancouver to San Diego. So I really like to be able to do that safely.

Jessmyn:
Yeah. Yeah, that would be cool though. I wonder how long that takes. Have you look at-

Nadalie:
So I will let you know when I’m in the neighborhood. I’m going to take my time, a couple of weeks at least.

Jessmyn:
Yeah. Yeah, that’s not too bad. Awesome.

Nadalie:
Yeah.

Jessmyn:
Well, the last thing that I have is really just if you could give yourself a single piece of advice at the start of it all, what would it be?

Nadalie:
You can do this. You’re going to make it. Something that I said to myself in the beginning was I’m going to give myself four or five years to figure this out. The way I saw it, that’s kind of like an undergraduate degree. Most of us have one of those. What’s it doing for you? Also, I calculated how much time I would be spending driving in traffic between the age I was to retirement, and it actually equaled about five years and that’s 24-hour days, like 24 hours times 365 times five years, that’s of driving, just commuting. So I was like, “You know what, what if I take that time and in that frame work, I create something amazing that’s going to change my life forever?” So I would tell myself that I can do it, just don’t give up. It’ll be okay. If you are listening to this, it’ll be okay, just don’t give up. I think the most important advice that anyone can give you is to not quit. You can quit your job, but don’t quit this.

Jessmyn:
No, I love that. I love that a lot. I think that’s actually interesting, that you calculated all of that. That’s not something that you think about, like how much-

Nadalie:
I hate driving in traffic. I hate it. There’s really bad traffic in Toronto. An hour and a half, two-hour commute is not strange. That’s the norm. So, two hours and that’s one way, so it’s four hours a day.

Jessmyn:
Yeah, that’s a lot. That’s a lot. I get that. It’s pretty similar in the Bay Area too, so… Wow. All right. Well, thank you so much, Nadalie, for being on here today. Where can people find you online?

Nadalie:
Almost anywhere. So if you look for me, I’m @nadaliebardo. That’s Nadalie with a D. You can check me out on my website, It’s All You Boo, and yeah, you’ll find me. I’m pretty much everywhere.

Jessmyn:
Well, thank you so much again. All right, guys, we’ll see you next time.

Nadalie:
Bye.

Jessmyn:
Bye.

Make Your Own Quiz For Free