Transforming Imperfect Action Into Success with Copywriter Bree Weber

From a young age, Bree Weber enjoyed all things reading and writing, and her passion for storytelling carried her through the years to land a job she loved for a book publisher. Although she loved her job, Bree made the decision to move and embark on a new journey with her boyfriend in 2015. So, […]

From a young age, Bree Weber enjoyed all things reading and writing, and her passion for storytelling carried her through the years to land a job she loved for a book publisher.

Although she loved her job, Bree made the decision to move and embark on a new journey with her boyfriend in 2015. So, she pitched the company she worked for to become their first remote employee. They approved the remote work as an independent contractor, and that’s when Bree’s business was born. After many years of trial and error, she’s finally found the path that provides her with purpose, passion, and profit.

Bree Weber’s Website: https://growthcopy.co/

Jessmyn:
Hi, everybody. Welcome back to Interact’s Creator Stories podcast. We had quite a bit of a break for the holidays, so hopefully, everyone had a good holiday season. Now, that we’re all back to work, hopefully, you guys are doing okay. I know I’m doing okay though because I have fun at my work. Today, for this episode, we are sitting with actually one of our strategic partners and certified consultants of Interact. Not to talk about quizzes, we really want to get to know more about you and your business, how you got here, and all that good stuff. With me today, I have Bree Weber and I’m going to let you do your own intro per usual, but she is a conversion copywriter and cold pitch evangelist. I’m curious to hear more about that and yeah. Tell us about your business.

Bree:
Yeah. I am a conversion copywriter. I work predominantly with both SAS startups and course creators and membership makers who are launching. There are two very different worlds that I hang out in. Then the newer part of my business has been in the cold pitch and cold emailing world, helping mostly with introverted freelance service-based businesses who are in the business of selling one-to-one client work and wanting to build up their client roster and their income and their confidence as well. I guess the way that I got started is a little bit crazy, so we can get into that, but that’s kind of what my business looks like now.

Jessmyn:
Yeah. I’d love to hear more about that. I know we talked before this and you just mentioned it right now, but you have a new part of your business and you did rebrand recently, so let’s start from the beginning. How did you get started and what did your business look like at that point?

Bree:
I always kind of felt for a long time, like I was an accidental entrepreneur because I didn’t really intend to go out on my own or start a business. I was working in book publishing. I started my career in London and I loved what I was doing. I was living in New York and working for an agency. Again, I really loved my job. I had decided with my partner that we were going to leave New York and kind of create our own life together. I asked my employer, if I could work remotely. They surprised me by saying, “Yes.” Then they surprised me even more when a few days before I was scheduled to leave, they said, “By the way, you can’t be an employee. You need to be an independent contractor. Can you just do your own taxes and your health insurance and get that all set up?”
I said, “Yes,” not really knowing entirely what I was getting into. I sort of started as, my business at that time as kind of an extension of my last employee job. It never really felt like it was mine. It never really felt intentional. It never really felt like I had a mission or a goal. I was just sort of continuing to do what I did at that job with them as a client and then with other companies and authors as a client.

Jessmyn:
Oh wow.

Bree:
After a while, that started to kind of drain on me. It felt a little bit heavy and I recognized that I was ready to do something new, but I had no idea what it is. I created a sort of mini venture for myself, where I had this master list of possible career ideas and business ideas, that I then randomly chose one and tested it out. I sort of piloted that kind of business idea a week at a time. I had this sort of set of criteria to define like, is this something that I’m passionate about? Does this serve a purpose in the market? Is this profitable? If it showed progress, I would continue. If it didn’t show progress, then I would just cut it, learn what I could from it and then move on to the next one. It was through that process that I eventually moved into content writing and that eventually became copywriting.

Jessmyn:
Nice. Wow. That is quite a process. What stuck out to me was it just seems so organized. My first question is, what did it feel like when you were ready to make that next step of, “Okay, I’m going to do my own thing.” Then how did you come up with that process? How did you come up with, “Okay, I’m going to figure XYZ out and that’s how I’m going to move forward.” Then you continued on doing that.

Bree:
Well, I have to say it didn’t feel organized. It felt super, super scary because I was basically walking into a failing all the time. That was really what I was trained to do is fail as quickly as possible to figure out what doesn’t work so I could figure out what did work. Part of the reason that I structured it that way is because I’d spent so long in my business, basically a couple of years thinking, “Oh, I just need to try this again. Or I need to try another slightly different way.” I would spend months and months and months on a particular marketing channel or business endeavor or an offer that I had created and never really getting any traction and never really feeling like I was getting anywhere. I wanted to structure of this to be somewhat rigid so that I could ensure that I was checking against reality and not just following entirely in my emotions.
I wanted there to be some balance there and I needed to be able to track what was happening and see it on paper to make it feel real for me. The process was again, really just failing constantly and then trying to learn and figure out what the lesson is, and then adapt and iterate as quickly as possible. It’s a little bit like taking the scientific method and applying it to my business. It’s developed a very experimental side of my business now.

Jessmyn:
Yeah. I love that. That was my first thought was, oh, it really sounds just like experimenting with different things and all of that. I like the way you said kind of just failing as quick as possible, because I think that’s a huge deal. People are so scared of failing. They don’t want to fail. As much as anyone can say, everyone needs to fail to figure it out. It’s so scary. what was going through your mind and how do you process that notion of, “Okay, I need to just fail as quickly as possible and not be afraid of it.”

Bree:
I think it was actually about saying it’s okay to be afraid. Be afraid and do it anyway. We say that a lot and it’s really hard to do. For me, one of the things that really helped was just kind of journaling. I had sort of a micro blog during the time of just my experience along the way like, “I tried this. It didn’t work. I feel really bad.” That would be a blog entry. I would just sort of believe that for myself. Then I could go back a few hours later and write down, “Okay, I processed it. This is what I did wrong. Or this is what I could do differently. Or this is what that process could look like in the future.” Kind of being afraid and doing it anyway, I think a big piece of it for me was shifting and kind of reframing how I was looking at it.
It was no longer about the outcome of I’m going to make X amount of dollars or I’m going to spend it this type of business, but I’m going to try this action, or I’m going to test this out or I’m trying to get 50 no’s. When you shift directions, you’re not running towards success, you’re actually running towards failure. It actually helps you to take faster action, feel more comfortable doing it in perfectly. Then you kind of end up in a what, for me at least, I’ve ended up in a much cooler spot that’s taken me on that road to success. Yeah. I think it has been the biggest piece was really that reframe and looking at failure as something to run towards rather than run away from.

Jessmyn:
I love that a lot. I feel like it’s such good advice and it is really hard to do, but I think having that piece of advice of looking at it in a different way could make a huge difference. If you try to do everything perfectly every time and I’m a perfectionist, that’s so funny that I’m over here saying, “I love that. It’s great.” I’m a perfectionist. It’d be so hard for me to do that myself. I really identify with that. I think for your own like sanity, it probably helped a lot rather than thinking all the time like, “Great. I wanted this outcome. It didn’t work. I’m upset about all this stuff.”
I love that. You did kind of mention a little bit about not looking for an outcome of money and what not. How did that fare out with your business in the beginning if that wasn’t something… I feel like part of why I’m asking is I think that a lot of people who are listening might think, “Wait, I’m trying to get a business to make money.” How do you move forward if that’s not something you’re thinking about?

Bree:
Yeah. It’s definitely super un-intuitive, counter-intuitive of like, oh, when you want money, stop thinking about money or when you want to get a client, we start thinking about clients. That took me a long time to get comfortable with. I still have those moments where I trip up. I’m not a hundred percent there. I don’t know if anyone ever gets there, but I think you still hold that outcome. You’re still thinking about it. You’re still looking at it. You’re still making goals and plans to get there. When it comes down to taking action, that’s when I think it’s important to detach from, “Oh, I’m trying to achieve X. I’m trying to make X amount of money,” and shifting the focus to I’m doing whatever the plan is, whatever the action item is and being really in that process and kind of in that moment. It’s definitely still tricky.
The whole time, I was like, “Oh, I made a thousand dollars this month.” At first, that was a huge thing. Then after a while I was like, “Oh my God, I only made a thousand dollars this month.” Your perspective on what those outcomes and accomplishments mean change along the process, because when I first was doing this venture, I was trying out different business ideas. Then it was within six months that I kind of landed on content writing. That really, really took off for me in beginning of 2018. By middle of 2018, I was like, “Okay, I’m a content writer. I’m testing this out and growing my business. I’m looking at data and results of how it’s growing kind of week over week and month over month.” Then by the end of the year, as I moved into 2019, I was like, “I really want to be a copywriter.”
I want to move away from content writing and move into copywriting. Then I was sort of doing that same thing, trying to grow week over week and month over month. There was still times, especially in 2019 where I would just get stuck. I would be seeing the same figures every month or the same types of projects that I didn’t want to be doing every month. For me, it really came down to confidence. I wasn’t confident in myself. I didn’t believe in myself. I had a lot of stories about not being good enough and it took me a long time to recognize that was getting in the way. That’s why I couldn’t detach from a lot of those outcomes because I felt like my self-worth was actually tied up in all of those.

Jessmyn:
Oh, wow. That’s a huge realization I think. A really like, I don’t want to use the word mature, but do you kind of get what I’m saying? It’s a very mature thought of like, “Oh yeah, this is getting in the way and if I keep going this way, it’s going to continue the way it’s going and I need to make a change. Here we go.” What was, I guess at that point then, when you made that realization, what did you do from there?

Bree:
I did a lot of journaling, a lot of verbal processing, a lot of just trying to work through my limiting beliefs, so some of those inner demons to understand where they’re coming from and why they’re coming out in certain ways. That kind of moved me into 2020. I was like, “Okay, I know the direction that I want to head. I know I want to be a conversion copywriter. I know the types of clients that I want to work with and the types of projects that I want to work on. I’m investing in mindset. I’m investing in my skills and I am basically going to try on, test out and experiment with believing in myself.” If I were a person who felt really confident, what would I do? If I was a person who believed in what she was doing, what would I do? I use that to start 2020. Of course, 2020 had different plans for all of us, but that was kind of the mentality that I want to into the year with.

Jessmyn:
I love that. It’s something that I’ve been really looking into recently is manifestation. That’s what comes to mind is, you kind of start, you try to attract the things that you want by just manifesting it. That’s kind of what caught my attention when you said that. 2020, yeah. It was kind of crazy for everyone. I know we talked before this and you mentioned that it was a hard start. I don’t want to be the one to tell the story, but go on and tell us that story. Also, just kind of tell us what it felt like. I think a lot of people were in the same position probably, especially in 2020, and maybe even now trying to pick up the pieces.

Bree:
Yeah. I started 2020 kind of looking back at 2019. I was like, “Okay, I’m working with dozens of clients.” I was pretty exhausted. I was averaging about $2,000 a month, which was not enough in terms of my financial goals. I was just sort of jumping from thing to thing and not really finding a space where I felt like I could really kind of plant my positioning and marketing flag. I moved into 2020 and got really clear about what I wanted to do and my goals. I made amazing progress in those first two months. Then pandemic hit, March hit, and I lost all of my clients, most of which were retainer clients, which I thought keep me safe. “I had just that moment of total devastation of like, Oh my God, what am I going to do? I’m basically starting all over from scratch.”
I kind of recalled everything that I did and that, my startup venture of like, “Okay, I’m going to test out an idea. I’m going to spin it up in a week. I’m going to see if that makes progress.” Kind of recognize that I really needed to do the same thing here, but sort of testing out business ideas, I’m basically testing out different ways of getting clients and building that piece of my business back up. I kind of went on a journey to start cold pitching in a really different way than I’ve seen it done before. A way that doesn’t really, for me, traditional cold pitching feels a little yucky and cold and feeling uncomfortable and I didn’t want to do it that way. I decided to approach it a very, very different way.
I saw immediate success. Within 30 days, I hit 10K for the first time in a month ever. That came almost exclusively from cold pitching. Since then I’ve continued to grow my business. I’m closer to 20 K months. I only work with one client at a time. I’m very selective about the projects that I work on and I regularly take vacations.

Jessmyn:
Oh yeah. Dude, that’s so important. Congratulations though.

Bree:
Thank you.

Jessmyn:
I think that’s awesome. I love how you kind of made that distinction of like, “Okay, I need to stop experimenting with business ideas, but I still need to experiment.” It’s just kind of pivoting and doing something a little bit different. That’s awesome. What I guess, say someone is in they’re listening or in a similar position where they’re like, “Yeah, the pandemic really screwed me over and now I need to kind of pick it back up.” I guess, where could they start, would you say, in kind of just getting it going again and restarting that business?

Bree:
Well, I think the first thing that is really important, whether you’re struggling or having major success is to reflect on what’s happening. I’m a big believer in collecting data. Data doesn’t have to be like big and scary. It can just be how many hours you worked on a project and how you felt when you worked on that project. That’s the kind of information that I look for. Just being able to look at where’s your income coming from, if any? What are the types of projects and clients you’re working on or working with? How you’re feeling about that whole process, what’s draining and what’s not so draining. Then being able to kind of pull that information together is like, that’s when you can actually start to make some decisions. One of the things that I looked at earlier in that kind of March process was I had been spending a lot of time on social media, but I really didn’t have a strategy.
I looked at how much time I was spending on posting and coming up with captions and engaging with people and how I felt when I was doing it. I recognized that that was exhausting me. I wasn’t enjoying it at all. It hadn’t brought me a single client. I was like, “Okay, great. That’s something I can pause right now, go back to at another time and I can try a different avenue.” I think being willing to pause or set some things aside, when you look at the data and see that it’s not working, to test something new. You’re just sort of, again, moving around all sort of all the different ideas that are options that are available to you and you don’t have to commit to anything forever. You just get to sort of try it on and see how it fits and see how it works for you.

Jessmyn:
I like that a lot. I think reflection is really big in business and it’s not something that people talk about a lot, but it’s necessary. I love that you will also tie in how do you feel about it? Recognizing like, “Okay, I actually don’t like this or this is exhausting. It’s making me tired, but I’m spending most of my time on it.” I think that’s super important to kind of go through. I love how you do that process. I feel like through this whole episode, you talked a lot about journaling and reflection. Is there something that you stick to like, I guess a prompt. I feel weird saying that. It’s like a school project, but do you have something that you stick to you or do you kind of just figure it out as you go?

Bree:
Well, I tried a lot of different styles of journaling and I don’t think there’s necessarily one that works for everyone or one even that works for me. It’s sort of what I need in the moment. That’s another thing that I’ve spent a lot of time on is just trying to figure out what my thoughts are and where they’re coming from. There are a couple of prompts that I use that tend to be the most helpful. One is just writing down like, what’s the story I’m telling myself? Then what are the observable facts? I try and write them sort of side-by-side because they’re often drastically different. Usually the story I’m telling myself is some sort of fear-mongering, worst case, impossible scenario. Then the facts are like, someone didn’t email me back or hasn’t to my email yet.
Those are the types of things that I’ll do or prompts that I’ll use when I’m feeling a little overwhelmed or scared. I also try to, just writing my fear like, what is my fear? What am I afraid of right now? Just writing it all down on paper or typing it out and seeing it outside of myself is really helpful to recognize one how insane some of my fears can be. Just feeling like it’s separated from me often helps me to feel like it’s not overwhelming me. It’s not consuming me. That’s really helpful. Then sometimes I’ll kind of ask, “What is that?” I have a lot of like negative self-talk and inner critic that I’m constantly trying to work through. I’ll often journal or ask myself, “What does that inner critic need? What are they trying to do to keep me safe? What would that safety mean for me?”
Try to understand what’s the benefit. I think some people call it like, “What’s the gift in the fear or the limiting belief,” because there’s so much that we can say like, “Oh, I’ve actually learned a lot by doing this thing that I didn’t think was really great for me.” Then looking for ways that we can recreate that in hopefully more healthy ways. Those are some of the prompts that I use, but I have a couple of tools that I’m using right now. One is the shine app, which is made by and for women. It kind of combines meditation and sort of inspiration with kind of your morning routine. I like to use that to kind of start my day. I also use a journal prompt called the mirror journal, which is by another copywriter named Kirsty Fanton has a background in psychology. I use that, which is really helpful if I’m in a particular bind that I want to work through.

Jessmyn:
I love that a lot. Also too, it’s just so important to kind of figure that stuff out and ask yourself the hard questions that you probably don’t even want to ask yourself. I like the way you also view it, your perspective on it. If it is a negative feeling or a negative self-talk or anything like that, you don’t see it as a weakness. You see it more of like, “Okay, this is something that, it’s trying to talk to me. I’m trying to tell myself something that I’m not really opening up to.” You use this journaling process as a way to open up to that and tell yourself like, “Here’s what I need from it.” I think that’s so good. I’m learning a lot from this right now. I’m going to get off this call and be like, “Okay, now I need to go figure out my own journal.” No, that’s awesome. That’s cool. Sweet.

Bree:
I definitely try. Or anyone who’s like, “I’m not a journaling person,” sometimes just talking out loud, just verbal processing can be really helpful. I’ll like send a voice note to my best friend or just like record it on my phone and then delete it after just to kind of work through some of those thoughts can be really helpful.

Jessmyn:
Yeah. I think that’s a good point. I didn’t even think of that, because I also journal. For me, it’s like, “Oh, this is an idea that I can do, but there are people out there who I know. I want to give them a journal so bad for their birthday or for Christmas or something like that. They’re like, “No, please don’t give me one. We’re not going to use it.” I’m sure there are entrepreneurs out there who are like, “There’s no way.”

Bree:
Yeah. I was anti journal for years. I was like, “No, that’s way too woo woo for me.” A lot of this stuff that I’ve been talking about like I, just a few years ago, would have been like, “That’s all BS. That doesn’t work. That’s not how reality is,” because I just had a lot of blocks around trying to connect with your feelings and connect with your thoughts. I didn’t even realize that you could decide what your thoughts were and control that. That seemed like a totally foreign concept to me. Yeah. We all start somewhere.

Jessmyn:
Yeah, no, I feel it. If you are listening and you’re not into journaling, I love the voice texting or recording it. I also recently bumped into something called walking meditation where it’s a five minute thing and you kind of just, you literally are just walking and it can either be pacing back and forth or you go out for a walk or wherever, but you are mindful walking, but you’re thinking more about maybe whatever you’re feeling, whatever issues or obstacles you’re currently in. If any of you are listening and you’re like, “Yeah, there’s no way I’m going to write this stuff down.” Check out, well, I guess yeah. Google search walking meditation, and maybe that’s something for you, because I think this is a really good way of actually overcoming some of those things that you do rely or you do over…
Gosh, I can’t talk right now. Some of those things that you… Oh my God, I keep trying to say overcome. Those obstacles that you get to when you are trying to run a business, especially like after the last year, maybe you also were starting from scratch. I love this. I think this is awesome.

Bree:
I’m totally going to try this walk and talk to meditation.

Jessmyn:
You should. You should try it. I haven’t really quite done it myself yet. With the pandemic, I feel like I just, even if people say, go for a walk. I just didn’t want to move. Don’t listen to me. Everyone should [crosstalk 00:26:38]. Go for walks.
See nature. Be outside. Don’t listen to me this moment. Yeah. I think I would want to try it myself. I think it’s so cool. It’s just, there was a podcast that mentioned it and she really explained it super well, but I can’t remember it for the life of me. It stuck because I was like, “Oh, that’s something that I want to try. It’s super quick.” I guess it could be however long you want, but five minutes out of your day is almost nothing. You just kind of like, “Okay, I’m processing through this and maybe you don’t want to write it down and that’s fine.

Bree:
Yeah. I think it makes total sense because one of the things that I actually do now that again, I didn’t do several years ago, it was just check in with myself throughout the day like, how are you feeling? What are you thinking about? What’s stressing you out. What’s exciting you? Just having those moments throughout the day, I think are really, really helpful just to kind of ground yourself and your intention or what your goals are, what you want to accomplish, if you want to be more productive. I think the walking and meditating idea, it seems very much aligned with walk-in talk therapy, which I feel is becoming more popular. It just seems like a lot of the science backed and like fully researched therapeutic methods are now becoming a little bit more democratized so that you can use a lot of the benefits of having a therapist or going to therapy or doing counseling on your own and a little bit of a DIY way so that you can be the one to lead yourself in those conversations, which is especially in business.
I felt like I learned how to take care of myself as a person, by figuring out what I needed to do as an entrepreneur.

Jessmyn:
I love that. I think that’s so big. It’s like, I know I keep saying that, but I really am learning a lot. I think that’s a huge realization to make because even if they might be separate parts of your life, it’s still you. It’s still connected and it both still matters just as much as the other one matters. I think that’s really big. I feel like that’s…

Bree:
Yeah. When I look back on 2020, I can see a lot of the success that I made financially, helped to improve my confidence and that helped to improve how I showed up in my relationships. It has this kind of web like structure, so that as one part of your business or life is going well, or maybe not so well, that will definitely trickle out and affect every other part of your life. I think kind of circling back, I think that’s why it’s another helpful reason to somewhat detach from some of those outcomes, because at the end of the day, it’s not about making X amount of dollars or landing a specific client.
It’s what those allow you to do. The process of getting there, like if your goal is freedom and then the process of getting to 10K or a hundred K or a million dollars eliminates your freedom, that’s not the way to do it. There’s a different path for you to make, for yourself to get to that outcome, to get to that eventual goal.

Jessmyn:
I love that. I guess what comes to mind, correct me if I’m wrong is kind of like a work smarter, not harder, type of deal to put it in more simpler terms. I like the way you said it better, but yeah. To put it in more simpler terms, I think it’s also important. Especially after last year, but in this year we should kind of move forward, but in a more positive and actual productive for your own emotions and also the actual business side, cause it all does come together.

Bree:
Yeah. I think adding onto that, like part of working smarter is figuring out how you work because someone else’s method or process or productivity routine or whatever may not be the right fit for you. I spent a long time trying other people’s playbooks and being disappointed when I didn’t get their results. That’s why all of this reflection, checking in journaling, whatever it is that you do that works for you to get more in tuned with your fears, your anxieties, your beliefs, all of those things that drive your emotions and drive your decisions. That’s the data that you need to use to start making more informed decisions so that you can work smarter.

Jessmyn:
I love that. That’s all I have. Well, thank you so much, Bree. That’s all the questions that I really had. I definitely learned a lot and I think this is going to be a great episode, especially to start off the new year. Everyone hopefully got a break over the holidays, but I know myself, I was already kind of the last two days, I was worrying like, “Okay, I need to get this studying to get that done.” I think taking a second, I think this is a perfect time to reflect since it is a new year. It’s new beginnings and all that good stuff. Yeah. Just thank you for opening up and telling us your story and how you kind of process all that and get through each day.

Bree:
Thank you so much for having me. This was a lot of fun to talk about.

Jessmyn:
Of course. I do have a couple last questions. My first is what are three things that most people won’t know or wouldn’t know about you?

Bree:
Okay. Probably the biggest is that I’ve basically been sort of a digital nomad, several times over. Every time I decided to move, which is a lot, I just sort of pack everything up or give it all away and then just go on the road until I find the city that I want to move to next.

Jessmyn:
Oh, I love that.

Bree:
That’s one thing. I think a second thing that people might not know about me. I’m a pretty outdoorsy person. I really like specifically really into rock climbing, but not the style with ropes and equipment. I like bouldering, because you’re just sort of free. There’s no ropes. You just have a pad for safety below you. It’s a great way to work through some fears.

Jessmyn:
Yeah. You said that and I was like, “Oh God. I don’t even think I’ve started climbing.” I would freak out. I’d be like, “Someone get me down. I need help.” That’s awesome.

Bree:
Then I guess the third thing would be, oh, I guess my very, very first career, I started as a classically trained musician.

Jessmyn:
Whoa, cool. What did you play?

Bree:
On the classical side, I was a clarinetist.

Jessmyn:
Nice. Yeah. That’s awesome. I’ve always wanted to play an instrument and never did.

Bree:
There’s still time. You can do it.

Jessmyn:
There is, but I have this notion that you have to start when your brain is a sponge because just like, I’m not coordinated now. I’m too far gone.

Bree:
Yeah. I struggle with that. One of the beliefs that I’m working on right now is that our brain is always a sponge and then it’s…

Jessmyn:
Perspective. I got to change my own mindset. I love that. Cool. My last question for you, take a second, if you need to, and this can either be kind of when you made that pivot after the 2020 pandemic cabin or even in the beginning, but what’s the single advice or piece of advice that you would give yourself at the start of it all, if you could go back and talk to yourself right now?

Bree:
I think the moment that I would probably go back to is definitely around the pandemic and when they started to make that pivot and something that I learned probably closer to the end of 2020 was to take imperfect action. I’ll say a piece of that is I think I always wanted to be somebody who was extraordinary. One of my great fears was that I was just an ordinary person. I think this past year has taught me that extraordinary people are just people who take ordinary action, even when they’re afraid. I think the sooner we can start taking those steps, even when they feel messy and out of control and a little scary, the sooner we get to where we want to get to, or even somewhere better.

Jessmyn:
You gave me the chills. I was like, “I’m not going to interrupt her,” but that was awesome. I can make you write a book for me now. I love that a lot. I think that’s good. Hopefully, everybody out there listening will also feel some kind of comfort from this, especially in the new year, trying to figure all that out. Thank you for that. Before I do forget, like I said earlier, I always forget this question, but where can people find you if they’re looking for you online?

Bree:
Yeah. I tend to hang out on my website, which is coldpitchcopy.com. I spend the most time social media wise on Instagram at the same handle, coldpitchcopy. On Instagram I do a little something called the Inner Circle, which is people who want to have more than a scrolling relationship, a little bit more one-on-one, who reach out and join the Inner Circle. I have an entire sort of like private, exclusive set of content and stories and background sort of behind the scenes bits about cold pitching tips that I share.

Jessmyn:
Cool. I love that. I think that’s pretty big, especially on Instagram. It’s like, they want you to comment to get better on their algorithm, but people just put kind of mindless comments everywhere of like, “Awesome. Looks great.” I love that. I think that’s awesome. Okay, cool. Thank you so much again for being on the show with us and that’s all I got guys.

Bree:
Thank you again so much for having me.

Jessmyn:
Of course. Bye, everyone.

Make Your Own Quiz For Free

Jessmyn Solana

Jessmyn Solana is the Partner Program Manager of Interact, a place for creating beautiful and engaging quizzes that generate email leads. Outside of Interact Jessmyn loves binge watching thriller and sci-fi shows, cuddling with her fluffy dog, and traveling to places she's never been before.

More Posts by Jessmyn Solana