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What kind of conflict resolution negotiator are you?

Everybody faces moments when you must negotiate to solve conflict. Whether with your family, foster children or with caseworkers, negotiating is essential. Find out what your natural Conflict resolution negotiation style is and learn how to use it to ultimately help you solve conflict. Take this quiz to find out your style...

Quiz Questions

  • 1.
    When you know that you will have to be a part of a conflict negotiation with your child, what do you look forward to?
    • A.
      The challenge and an opportunity to win and prove you are right.
      (Correlates to: Competitive)
    • B.
      Finding creative solutions to satisfy both you and the child.
      (Correlates to: Collaborative)
    • C.
      Finding solutions that are fair to both of you.
      (Correlates to: Compromising)
    • D.
      You don't look forward to negotiations because you don't like conflict.
      (Correlates to: Avoiding)
    • E.
      Satisfying the needs of the child and maintaining relationships.
      (Correlates to: Accommodating)
  • 2.
    When starting a conflict resolution discussion with a child, you...
    • A.
      Strive for mutual gain using open and seeking questions to determine the child's needs.
      (Correlates to: Collaborative)
    • B.
      Stay quiet and pass opening negotiations on to the caseworker or mediator
      (Correlates to: Avoiding)
    • C.
      Take time to connect on a personal level, as you want to set a positive tone for the negotiation.
      (Correlates to: Accommodating)
    • D.
      Listen to the child's proposition before presenting your own.
      (Correlates to: Compromising)
    • E.
      Push to quickly present your information. You have little time for social formalities before getting down to business, and you want this situation over as soon as possible.
      (Correlates to: Competitive)
  • 3.
    During a conflict resolution negotiation, how do you communicate with the child?
    • A.
      In a friendly and open manner. You find common interests to talk about, such as the weather, school etc.
      (Correlates to: Accommodating)
    • B.
      In a passive manner and you tread with a great deal of caution. You may attempt to shift responsibility to the caseworker
      (Correlates to: Avoiding)
    • C.
      In an assertive and direct manner. You focus on the task at hand, so initial openings and greetings are no more than cursory.
      (Correlates to: Competitive)
    • D.
      In an open and honest manner. You are focused on finding imaginative solutions through the use of logic and thorough research.
      (Correlates to: Collaborative)
    • E.
      In a fair manner but eager to end the conflicgt. You happily trade one thing for another.
      (Correlates to: Compromising)
  • 4.
    If a conflict resolution negotiation is not going well, you...
    • A.
      Aim to find middle ground and secure the resolution quickly, even if you end up agreeing with less than you wanted.
      (Correlates to: Compromising)
    • B.
      Focus on strategies you can use to achieve your desired outcome, with no concern for the child.
      (Correlates to: Competitive)
    • C.
      Get frustrated and feel that you are being personally taken advantage of. You are inclined to walk away from the negotiation.
      (Correlates to: Avoiding)
    • D.
      Focus on the available data to look for suitable alternatives to achieve the desired resolution.
      (Correlates to: Collaborative)
    • E.
      Attempt to smooth over differences to satisfy the needs of the child. Likely to concede to accommodate the child.
      (Correlates to: Accommodating)
  • 5.
    Are you confident negotiating alone, or do you prefer a team?
    • A.
      You want to be involved but in the periphery, befriending the child and gaining useful insights.
      (Correlates to: Accommodating)
    • B.
      Prefer having caseworker or other person there, but willing to take the lead or indeed any other role if needed.
      (Correlates to: Compromising)
    • C.
      Prefer negotiating individually because you trust your instincts and ability to adapt your strategy to the situation.
      (Correlates to: Competitive)
    • D.
      Much prefer working in a team to brainstorm ideas and share suggestions.
      (Correlates to: Collaborative)
    • E.
      Prefer action behind the scenes and passing the physical negotiation process to caseworkers.
      (Correlates to: Avoiding)
  • 6.
    When tempers flare, how do you deal with the situation?
    • A.
      You feel threatened and vulnerable, which may cause you to shut down and delay any kind of decision.
      (Correlates to: Avoiding)
    • B.
      Suggest taking a quick break, and then have both you and the child go over the options again calmly, and then discuss the issue.
      (Correlates to: Compromising)
    • C.
      Seek to mend personal fences by any means possible. This could be by changing the subject or injecting humour into the negotiation.
      (Correlates to: Accommodating)
    • D.
      Reiterate and reinforce why your course of action is a good one, in order to force the child to agree.
      (Correlates to: Competitive)
    • E.
      Try to diffuse the situation exploring new and alternative solutions for consideration.
      (Correlates to: Collaborative)
  • 7.
    What situation would unnerve you or make you lack confidence?
    • A.
      Better planning by the child would make you feel unnerved, which might make you rush the negotiation process.
      (Correlates to: Compromising)
    • B.
      If the child is highly upset and aggressive, it becomes difficult to build a relationship with them.
      (Correlates to: Accommodating)
    • C.
      You tend not to get phased by conflict negotiation situations as you have confidence in your ability and you can switch tack quickly.
      (Correlates to: Competitive)
    • D.
      The essence of loyalty, caring and trust being questioned or challenged. This could be through a remark or comment made by the child.
      (Correlates to: Collaborative)
    • E.
      Many things unnerve you in conflict negotiations. Aggression from the child, conflict with the caseworker, lack of preparation time, amongst others.
      (Correlates to: Avoiding)
  • 8.
    At the conclusion of a negotiation, you...
    • A.
      May crack under the pressure and make give in to the child's demands.
      (Correlates to: Avoiding)
    • B.
      Are concerned that the child feels the final outcome was fair.
      (Correlates to: Compromising)
    • C.
      Care about what the child or caseworker thinks about you, and want to end the negotiation on a positive note.
      (Correlates to: Accommodating)
    • D.
      Make sure both you and the child have their goals met, which could take longer than desired.
      (Correlates to: Collaborative)
    • E.
      Are more concerned about whether you have achieved your goals over the child.
      (Correlates to: Competitive)

Quiz Outcomes

  • 1.
    Competitive
    You are a highly results-driven, focussed and assertive negotiator who can often become aggressive. You thrive in a negotiation situation as you enjoy the opportunity to win. You have a strategic mind, therefore you don't get phased by your opposition. Being right matters more to you than preserving relationships.
  • 2.
    Collaborative
    You are an open and honest negotiator, who understands the concerns and interests of the other party. You enjoy negotiations especially if it involves finding creative solutions to mutually satisfy both parties. However, you often turn simple situations into more complicated ones by overthinking and exploring many alternatives.
  • 3.
    Compromising
    Your main concern while negotiating is finding middle ground and doing what's fair for both parties. You would rather compromise and settle with less than anticipated in order to satisfy the other party's needs. You may rush negotiations and make concessions too quickly which can lead to a loss.
  • 4.
    Avoiding
    You really don't like negotiations! You try to avoid any conflict by any means possible, maybe by passing the responsibility to another member of your team or staying quiet. You find negotiations intimidating and would be susceptible to threats, therefore you would rather work behind the scenes.
  • 5.
    Accommodating
    Your main concern while negotiating is preserving relationships. You like to connect on a personal level, and you would be put out if the other party wasn't interested in also building relationships. It matters to you what the other party thinks of you.