Related Quizzes

Use this Quiz

Copy this quiz into your free Interact account, edit the content however you'd like, set it up and then share it on your website and social media channels.

Start your 14 day free trial today to begin creating your own quizzes!

Start your free trial

Which hobby should you try next?

In these times of social distancing and world upheaval, boredom comes knocking on the door with a side of anxiety and depression. Take this fun quiz to find out which hobby you should try next to fill all your extra spare time – and soothe the inner turmoil that comes with living through pandemic times.

Quiz Questions

  • 1.
    What does your ideal Friday night look like?
    • A.
      I love to curl up with a good book. My best friends can be found between those pages.
      (Correlates to: Your next hobby should be... Writing!)
    • B.
      I love to go to art museums and look at the beautiful colors on the walls. It’s like a dream world!
      (Correlates to: Your next hobby should be... Artistic!)
    • C.
      Anything active! After a long week of work, I need to get out and move my body! Dancing, anyone?
      (Correlates to: Your next hobby should be... Physical!)
    • D.
      I love to come home and put on a good record and zone out with a nice meal and cold drink. The right song really puts me at ease.
      (Correlates to: Your next hobby should be... Musical!)
  • 2.
    How would your best friends describe you?
    • A.
      The melody to their harmony. Always up for a good night of live music.
      (Correlates to: Your next hobby should be... Musical!)
    • B.
      Colorful and creative, you express your moods with your outfits and you’re always influenced by the beauty of your surroundings.
      (Correlates to: Your next hobby should be... Artistic!)
    • C.
      Action Man, always game to try the next fun thing, like Axe Throwing or the new Archery Range in town.
      (Correlates to: Your next hobby should be... Physical!)
    • D.
      Nose in a Book! Imaginative and invested in the people around you, almost as much as the characters in your favorite novels.
      (Correlates to: Your next hobby should be... Writing!)
  • 3.
    What do you consider to be your best personality traits?
    • A.
      Harmonious, social, performative, great taste in music.
      (Correlates to: Your next hobby should be... Musical!)
    • B.
      Introspective, imaginative, good with words, thoughtful.
      (Correlates to: Your next hobby should be... Writing!)
    • C.
      Energetic, enthusiastic, dedicated, always happy to lend a hand.
      (Correlates to: Your next hobby should be... Physical!)
    • D.
      Creative, exspressive, colorful, life of the party!
      (Correlates to: Your next hobby should be... Artistic!)
  • 4.
    How do you feel about hobbies, anyway??
    • A.
      I’ve always enjoyed having something creative to do outside of work. It really helps to ground me, and it’s a great way to unwind after a long day.
      (Correlates to: )
    • B.
      I took some art classes in high school, but haven’t really done much since.
      (Correlates to: )
    • C.
      Hobbies are for retired people and children under 12, aren’t they?
      (Correlates to: )
    • D.
      I once learned how to make a rope basket with a kit I got for Christmas, does that count?
      (Correlates to: )
  • 5.
    Which scene looks like the best way to ground you and recharge your batteries?
    • A.
      What Dreams May Come. Painting, playing with color, and bringing your dreams to life… and afterlife.
      (Correlates to: Your next hobby should be... Artistic!)
    • B.
      August Rush. Immerse yourself in sound and find your way home through symphonic resonance!
      (Correlates to: Your next hobby should be... Musical!)
    • C.
      Becoming Jane. She writes her woes in satirical disregard of social comfort!
      (Correlates to: Your next hobby should be... Writing!)
    • D.
      Footloose. One man’s love of dance spurs a town in mourning into a musical rebellion!
      (Correlates to: Your next hobby should be... Physical!)
  • 6.
    Let's crack open your highschool yearbook - you were voted Most Likely To?
    • A.
      Go to the Olympics!
      (Correlates to: Your next hobby should be... Physical!)
    • B.
      Become a Rockstar!
      (Correlates to: Your next hobby should be... Musical!)
    • C.
      Join Gryffindor!
      (Correlates to: Your next hobby should be... Writing!)
    • D.
      Paint The World!
      (Correlates to: Your next hobby should be... Artistic!)
  • 7.
    Which TV personality best fits you?
    • A.
      Rory Gilmore from Glimore Girls. An aspiring journalist and budding romantic, she’s always got a notebook and her favorite pen handy. #StarsHollow2Yale
      (Correlates to: Your next hobby should be... Writing!)
    • B.
      Bob Ross from The Joy Of Painting. His hair is a national treasure, and his zen artistry heals the soul. #HappyAccidents
      (Correlates to: Your next hobby should be... Artistic!)
    • C.
      Captain Holt and Kevin from Brooklyn 99. Their love of hula hooping brought them closer together. #NoOneWillEverBelieveYou
      (Correlates to: Your next hobby should be... Physical!)
    • D.
      Phoebe from Friends. She got inspiration from her daily life for her hit songs. #SmellyCat
      (Correlates to: Your next hobby should be... Musical!)
  • 8.
    What’s your theme song?
    • A.
      Paperback Writer by The Beatles. “So I wanna be a paperback writer!”
      (Correlates to: Your next hobby should be... Writing!)
    • B.
      Your Song by Elton John. “I sat on the roof and kicked off the moss/Well, a few of the verses, well, they've got me quite cross”
      (Correlates to: Your next hobby should be... Musical!)
    • C.
       Andy Warhol by David Bowie. “Andy Warhol, silver screen/Can’t tell them apart at all.”
      (Correlates to: Your next hobby should be... Artistic!)
    • D.
      Canned Heat by Jamiroquai. “You know I heard that boogie rhythm, hey/I had no choice but to get down, down, down, down.”
      (Correlates to: Your next hobby should be... Physical!)
  • 9.
    Have you ever considered trying a hobby to boost your mental health?
    • A.
      You can do that? Count me in!
      (Correlates to: )
    • B.
      Tell me more. I’ve been going through some hard times and my anxiety is starting to become overwhelming. I’ll try anything.
      (Correlates to: )
    • C.
      I’ve already tried art therapy and creative journaling, but if you think a dance class might help, sign me up!
      (Correlates to: )
    • D.
      No way. No how. I’m good. My life isn’t so uncomfortable that I need help – yet.
      (Correlates to: )

Quiz Outcomes

  • 1.
    Your next hobby should be... Musical!
    If you ask most people on this planet if they like music, they’ll say yes without thinking twice. Even hearing impaired folks say they like to dance to the vibrations they feel when music is loud and bass is thumping!Music makes you happy! And helps you feel comfortable with feeling sad.It lightens your feet when they’re feeling heavy, and gives you an outlet when you feel mad! (Rushhour traffic, anyone?)It captures the emotions and moods that we’re not great at expressing ourselves, and gives them voice and rhythm, and in the case of the great songs, can harness the power of human spirit and bring it into shared experience.So it’s no wonder that getting into a musical hobby will boost your mental health!It’s a versatile medium that can respond to any feelings you have – from the heavy impact of percussion, to the calm strum of a ukulele, or even the purposeful fidgeting at piano keys – creating sound and music can help you work through heavy emotions and balance any mood.We all know how the right song at the right time can give you the permission you need to connect with a moment or feeling, and when you learn to make that music yourself, the effect can be incredibly cathartic.Physically, playing an instrument like guitar or piano stimulates both hemispheres of the brain, and activates the bridge that connects them.The benefit for you? It improves your memory and increases your overall brainpower!All while calming you down and chilling you out! Add in a social aspect like playing in a band with friends and you’ve got a mental health outlet that should increase your overall happiness.Added bonus, setting and achieving goals can help beat anxiety and depression. So, when you set a goal of mastering a new song or learning a new chord, you’ll likely boost your confidence! And that can spill over into other aspects of your life, like work and relationships.So how should you incorporate music into your life?1. Choose your weapon! — And by weapon, I mean instrument. Whether you plan to wield a mighty Axe like guitar legend Slash, pummel your pain away on the drums like Dave Grohl, or even tickle the keys on a dainty flute like Lizzo, you need something to make some noise with!And because practice is crucial to mastering any instrument, you’re going to want to buy one of your very own!But don’t blow your budget on a high end instrument before you know which end the sound comes out of! A perusal of craigslist should land you a decently preloved instrument that will get you through the basics. That way, when it’s time to level up, you’ll have some working knowledge of what you’d like in your forever instrument.2. Practice, practice, practice. — Just like riding a bike or dribbling a basketball, you’re probably going to have a learning curve. Luckily, with music, the only things getting hurt are going to be your eardrums, so buckle down, apologize to your poor inner cochlea, and get to making some sweet, sweet ruckus.But don’t go so hard you sour the whole experience by turning it into a negative job that you dread doing. Instead, set aside some time to achieve small goals, and if you’re feeling the groove, by all means play for hours! Just try not to let any day be a zero.3. Find community! — Check out all the super helpful YouTubers out there who have dedicated their time and channels to teaching you how to play your new instrument. You can even sign up for group sessions at some of your local community centers, or start up your own band for a jam session.Even though playing by yourself can be great, having a community of other musicians to not only inspire you but keep you accountable to your practice will have you mastering your sound in no time!Overall, music is something that every culture throughout time has created, from the first voices raised in harmony, to the most complex of modern synthesizers, and it’s about time you got in on the action!“Music is the shorthand of emotion.”- Leo TolstoyWhen You’re Ready to Try Something NewIt can be easy to hop on the latest trends when you see them pop up on TikTok, but not all of us are cut out for viral dance crazes and crate challenges. For some, it’s much better to pick a passion and pursue it until our passion and our proficiency meet in a perfect place of practiced prowess.Aside from becoming super wicked good at something that interests you, hobbies can also give you lower stress, better physical health, more sleep, more social connections, improved work performance, and increased happiness!It’s important to have a passion to pursue outside of your regular work schedule, something creative as an outlet that has nothing to do with a paycheck.Regardless of whether or not you’re a seasoned Pinterest Success Story Level Hobby Crafter, or you’re just getting started with your very first coloring book purchase, here are a few tips to get you started on your next rewarding, soul filling, mental health boosting hobby:How to Hobby Like a Pinterest Pro!1. Find Something That You Actually Want To DoConsider all your options. There are outside factors like time, space, and affordability, but the most important thing is finding something that interests you enough that you’ll actually want to stick with it until you’re good at it.This could be anything! The sky's the limit, so if you want to try your hand at pottery, or take up roller skating, play a new instrument, or even learn another language, what matters is that it’s something you find meaningful and enjoyable.There are a ton of different classes available at the Happy Hobby Center for Health, Wellness, and Interesting Pursuits. Check our online schedule to see what piques your interest!You can even check our YouTube channel Happy Hobbies for tutorials, tips, and tricks on a wide range of topics, all taught by fellow enthusiasts!2. Rethink How You Think About Hobbies and Your TimeTo someone who’s never had a hobby before, they can seem a bit like a guilty pleasure self-indulgence. When you’re already busy working your day job and taking care of your homelife, a hobby can feel like a drain on your already limited time and energy. But a hobby is the opposite of a drain!You can reclaim bits of time from your screens and simple distractions, and repurpose them in pursuit of something that not only fulfills you, but is proven to increase your physical health, help you sleep better, lower your stress, and improve your work performance.So ditch the game on your phone in favor of playing a real game with friends. Or skip the reality TV and spend some time rocking out on the Ukulele.Check out our Hobbyist’s Accountability App to stay on track with your practice. You’ll even get daily inspirations and mindset prompts to keep you engaged with your new hobby.3. Focus on Purpose over ProductivityWhenever you start something new, there’s going to be a bit of a gap between what you love and are inspired by… and the quality of work that your skill level is capable of producing. Even DaVinci didn’t paint Mona Lisa on his first try, so forgive yourself for your first attempts and stick with it.In our achievement oriented culture, it can be hard to do things purely for enjoyment’s sake, but that’s what a hobby is. It’s an outlet for creativity and energy, and will be rewarding whether or not you become ‘successful’ at your newfound love.So challenge yourself to express for the sake of pure enjoyment, instead of rewards and accolades. Instead, find reward in the satisfaction of knowing that time and practice result in steady progress, and the knowledge that even slow mastery is a worthy pursuit.Hobbies should be low pressure, relaxing outlets for your downtime and, above all, bring you genuine joy and fulfillment.Hobbies Help Happiness!Hey there, I’m Bobby Williamson, Licensed Art Therapist, hobby enthusiast, and founder of Happy Hobby Center for Health, Wellness, and Interesting Pursuits.It’s my mission to bring the real therapy of meaningful hobbies to everyone who needs an outlet to express themselves. So I’ve created a space for all interests to come together and thrive.With weekly classes in everything from fingerpainting to juggling, music lessons to sign language speakeasies, and everything in between, there’s something for everyone, along with a community that welcomes all newcomers.I’ve been a guest on many podcasts, including “You Can Do It DIY,” and “Hobby Talk,” and you can find my new book, “Hobbies for Health and Happiness,” wherever books are sold.Build Your CommunityHere are some resources to help you on your hunt for a hobby that heals your heart and uplifts your flow.1. Love a good tutorial? Check out my Youtube Channel, Happy Hobby. Every week we share process videos by instructors at the Happy Hobby center. Like and Subscribe for all the best content to help you find your next hobby.2. Love a good inspo reel? Follow me on Instagram @HappyHobby where I share updates of new enthusiasts groups, crafting workshops, and supply hauls.3. Don’t know where to begin but know that your life is missing a passion project? Book a discovery session with me and we’ll discuss where your interests and aptitudes lie, and tour the center so you can try what’s available. You might even make a connection or two with other people who are into the same things you are!Hop on the Hobbby Wagon!Head on over to your inbox to grab the free Hobby Intro Guide based on your quiz results. It’ll give you a rundown of where to get started once you decide which hobby is right for you.Over the next few days, I'll be sharing more ideas with you, as well as a schedule of classes and social events that relate to what you’re into!“A hobby a day keeps the doldrums away.”— Phyllis McGinley
  • 2.
    Your next hobby should be... Physical!
    Everyone has a body, and when you get yours moving, it boosts your mental and physical health, quiets your inner monologue, and releases happy inducing endorphins into your system!But hitting the gym is tantamount to torture for some, and those gym gains are empty wins if you’re not passionate about it. So why not turn your pursuit of exercise into a fun and rewarding hobby, like dance, sports, hiking, or a mindful movement practice like Yoga or Thai Chi.As it turns out, finding your inner yogi can lead to decreased anxiety and depression – but yoga isn’t the only way to get your body moving and limber!The real goal with any physical hobby is to get good enough that you can easily enter a flow state, that beautiful balance between complete immersion in a task, and surrender of ego.That’s right, when you’re so good at something that it feels like autopilot is charging your batteries, the little voice that’s always running in the background just wondrously shuts up.And you find yourself connected with your body and it’s movements in a way that feels a bit like church, without all the hymns.By setting a physical challenge for yourself, like mastering a two foot spin on roller skates, scaling a boulder on a hiking trail, or finally mastering Crow position in yoga class, you’ll boost your confidence and self-esteem.Bonus, you’ll also have a great new awareness of your body and just how gloriously powerful and amazing it is.And by pursuing a type of movement you actually enjoy, you’ll actually look forward to each sweat session.Here are a few things to consider when picking a new physical hobby:1. Safety First!Any new physical hobby can come with a steep learning curve, and some tough tumbles, but if you invest in the right safety gear, you can save yourself some of the growing pains that come with the rookie season.Consider your current level of fitness when you’re considering your new hobby. If you’ve never tried rock climbing before, you’re probably going to want to buy good shoes and a chalk bag before you invest in belay glasses or a buddy harness.If you’ve never skated a day in your life, don’t skip the wrist guards and knee pads, but don’t blow all your money on high end skates, either.It’s ok to start with beginner classes and gear until you’ve mastered the basics and have the knowledge to properly invest in upgrades.2. Consult the Pros!There are great classes you can take, or groups you can join when you’re trying to learn something new. Check the schedules at your local Community Center or YM/YWCA to see what’s available.Don’t be afraid to fall down the YouTube rabbit hole. There are plenty of people out there interested in what you’re into, and they’ve dedicated their channels to tutorials and insider tips and tricks.So if your passion is hula hooping while riding a unicycle and playing the bagpipes, chances are there’s a channel for that, and a large subscriber list.3. Practice, Practice, Practice.Just like a gym membership doesn’t make your muscles bigger if you don’t use it, your skill at a new hobby won’t grow until you dedicate time and energy to getting better.Everyone starts somewhere, so practice the basics, even if it’s just learning to fall without injuring yourself. Don’t let any day pass without a bit of practice, even if it’s 10 minutes of stretching, and you’ll see improvement.By creating a regular routine and practicing drills, you’ll increase your muscle memory and before you know it, the things that once looked like magic on TikTok will be just another trick in your arsenal!“Movement is a medicine for creating change in a person’s physical, emotional, and mental states.”– Carol WelchWhen You’re Ready to Try Something NewIt can be easy to hop on the latest trends when you see them pop up on TikTok, but not all of us are cut out for viral dance crazes and crate challenges. For some, it’s much better to pick a passion and pursue it until our passion and our proficiency meet in a perfect place of practiced prowess.Aside from becoming super wicked good at something that interests you, hobbies can also give you lower stress, better physical health, more sleep, more social connections, improved work performance, and increased happiness!It’s important to have a passion to pursue outside of your regular work schedule, something creative as an outlet that has nothing to do with a paycheck.Regardless of whether or not you’re a seasoned Pinterest Success Story Level Hobby Crafter, or you’re just getting started with your very first coloring book purchase, here are a few tips to get you started on your next rewarding, soul filling, mental health boosting hobby:How to Hobby Like a Pinterest Pro!1. Find Something That You Actually Want To DoConsider all your options. There are outside factors like time, space, and affordability, but the most important thing is finding something that interests you enough that you’ll actually want to stick with it until you’re good at it.This could be anything! The sky's the limit, so if you want to try your hand at pottery, or take up roller skating, play a new instrument, or even learn another language, what matters is that it’s something you find meaningful and enjoyable.There are a ton of different classes available at the Happy Hobby Center for Health, Wellness, and Interesting Pursuits. Check our online schedule to see what piques your interest!You can even check our YouTube channel Happy Hobbies for tutorials, tips, and tricks on a wide range of topics, all taught by fellow enthusiasts!2. Rethink How You Think About Hobbies and Your TimeTo someone who’s never had a hobby before, they can seem a bit like a guilty pleasure self-indulgence. When you’re already busy working your day job and taking care of your homelife, a hobby can feel like a drain on your already limited time and energy. But a hobby is the opposite of a drain!You can reclaim bits of time from your screens and simple distractions, and repurpose them in pursuit of something that not only fulfills you, but is proven to increase your physical health, help you sleep better, lower your stress, and improve your work performance.So ditch the game on your phone in favor of playing a real game with friends. Or skip the reality TV and spend some time rocking out on the Ukulele.Check out our Hobbyist’s Accountability App to stay on track with your practice. You’ll even get daily inspirations and mindset prompts to keep you engaged with your new hobby.3. Focus on Purpose over ProductivityWhenever you start something new, there’s going to be a bit of a gap between what you love and are inspired by… and the quality of work that your skill level is capable of producing. Even DaVinci didn’t paint Mona Lisa on his first try, so forgive yourself for your first attempts and stick with it.In our achievement oriented culture, it can be hard to do things purely for enjoyment’s sake, but that’s what a hobby is. It’s an outlet for creativity and energy, and will be rewarding whether or not you become ‘successful’ at your newfound love.So challenge yourself to express for the sake of pure enjoyment, instead of rewards and accolades. Instead, find reward in the satisfaction of knowing that time and practice result in steady progress, and the knowledge that even slow mastery is a worthy pursuit.Hobbies should be low pressure, relaxing outlets for your downtime and, above all, bring you genuine joy and fulfillment.Hobbies Help Happiness!Hey there, I’m Bobby Williamson, Licensed Art Therapist, hobby enthusiast, and founder of Happy Hobby Center for Health, Wellness, and Interesting Pursuits.It’s my mission to bring the real therapy of meaningful hobbies to everyone who needs an outlet to express themselves. So I’ve created a space for all interests to come together and thrive.With weekly classes in everything from fingerpainting to juggling, music lessons to sign language speakeasies, and everything in between, there’s something for everyone, along with a community that welcomes all newcomers.I’ve been a guest on many podcasts, including “You Can Do It DIY,” and “Hobby Talk,” and you can find my new book, “Hobbies for Health and Happiness,” wherever books are sold.Build Your CommunityHere are some resources to help you on your hunt for a hobby that heals your heart and uplifts your flow.1. Love a good tutorial? Check out my Youtube Channel, Happy Hobby. Every week we share process videos by instructors at the Happy Hobby center. Like and Subscribe for all the best content to help you find your next hobby.2. Love a good inspo reel? Follow me on Instagram @HappyHobby where I share updates of new enthusiasts groups, crafting workshops, and supply hauls.3. Don’t know where to begin but know that your life is missing a passion project? Book a discovery session with me and we’ll discuss where your interests and aptitudes lie, and tour the center so you can try what’s available. You might even make a connection or two with other people who are into the same things you are!Hop on the Hobbby Wagon!Head on over to your inbox to grab the free Hobby Intro Guide based on your quiz results. It’ll give you a rundown of where to get started once you decide which hobby is right for you.Over the next few days, I'll be sharing more ideas with you, as well as a schedule of classes and social events that relate to what you’re into!“A hobby a day keeps the doldrums away.”— Phyllis McGinley
  • 3.
    Your next hobby should be... Artistic!
    If you want to talk about the healing properties of hobbies, look no further than the zen face of your nearest artist friend to see the peace and serenity that comes from expressing your emotions through color, texture, and value. Creative activities are scientifically proven to reduce stress, calm anxiety, and even balance mood disturbances.So even if you’ve never explored your creative side, it might be time to pick up a paintbrush, pencil, or even palette knife, or try your hand at pottery or knitting. These hobbies leave you with a tangible piece of art at the end, and even if you don’t think of it as a masterpiece, you’ll still have something to show for the work you’ve given to the process.Creating art allows your mind to enter a safe place while it chews over the tougher issues you have going on.Because while you’re creating, you have the power to shift your thoughts from your current condition, whether it be health concerns, job woes, or relationship strife, and shift them to the more positive aspects of your life. That’s right, crafting can mimic the effects of mindful meditation!Studies show that creative activities produce positive emotions that produce an upward spiral of feel-good vibes. If you’re nervous about being creative, take a course in abstract art where the focus is on expression and freeform creations.Creating different works of art is both soothing and calming to the mind, while also being enjoyable and mentally stimulating. Creating any form of art keeps the mind sharp and focused, builds up your self-esteem, and keeps your mind working like a muscle.Painting and crafting aren’t your thing? Try photography! Nothing forces you to really sit in your surroundings and observe them quite like photography. So many beautiful opportunities can be missed if you don’t notice them when the light is good, and it helps you reframe the boring every day details into snapshots of beauty and appreciation.You can even use your photography as a journal to document your mental health and moods over time.Here are a few tips to help you get started on your new creative hobby:1. Mindset & SuppliesFirst things first, you’ve gotta figure out what you like to play with. For someone who doesn’t like getting their hands dirty, clay and sculpture might not be right for you. But if you love exploring the fun word of color, then maybe paint is your medium.No matter what you pick, you’re going to need a space to create your magic. So make it cozy, make it functional, and make sure it’s free from unnecessary distractions. Cover it in inspiration, or leave it bare, but make it your own and keep it organized.A cluttered studio can be a huge demotivator, so ask yourself these questions about your space:Do you work best with or without music?Is the lighting right?Could your work be damaged by water, animals, or anything else?Can you store your supplies easily and safely?Is there room to move around or will you feel cramped?Having the right space will help you enter a creative mindset more easily, and help you stay on task when it’s time to work on your skills.2. How To PracticeFigure out how much time you realistically have to dedicate to art, and then properly dedicate it.Practice always makes better, and the taste that brought you to art isn’t going to be satisfied by your skill until you give it a solid effort – so take the time to really give your new hobby the focus it deserves.You can find downtime throughout your schedule to practice things like sketching, but if you don’t have the time, make the time.Notice when you aren’t using your time to further your hobby, and see if you can repurpose some of it. Time spent playing Angry Birds in the bathroom can easily be turned into time spent watching art tutorials on YouTube.And theoretical practice can be almost as helpful as applied practice – so making your Art board on Pinterest actually counts towards your overall art practice!3. ExperimentationNever forget that a hobby is meant to be fun, but it’s also supposed to challenge you and give you the opportunity to grow, so always keep it fresh by experimenting.Learn the basics of whichever medium you choose, then think outside the box!The only way to really get better is to try things you’ve never done before, so leave the comfort zone behind and strike out for new horizons!The biggest thing when practicing art is to never give up. If you just keep practicing, then it doesn’t matter how old you are, where you are in life, or how much time you’ve been at it.Just keep practicing and trying to improve every single day. The results will follow.“Art is to be moved, to love, to hope, to tremble, to live.”— Auguste RodinWhen You’re Ready to Try Something NewIt can be easy to hop on the latest trends when you see them pop up on TikTok, but not all of us are cut out for viral dance crazes and crate challenges. For some, it’s much better to pick a passion and pursue it until our passion and our proficiency meet in a perfect place of practiced prowess.Aside from becoming super wicked good at something that interests you, hobbies can also give you lower stress, better physical health, more sleep, more social connections, improved work performance, and increased happiness!It’s important to have a passion to pursue outside of your regular work schedule, something creative as an outlet that has nothing to do with a paycheck.Regardless of whether or not you’re a seasoned Pinterest Success Story Level Hobby Crafter, or you’re just getting started with your very first coloring book purchase, here are a few tips to get you started on your next rewarding, soul filling, mental health boosting hobby:How to Hobby Like a Pinterest Pro!1. Find Something That You Actually Want To DoConsider all your options. There are outside factors like time, space, and affordability, but the most important thing is finding something that interests you enough that you’ll actually want to stick with it until you’re good at it.This could be anything! The sky's the limit, so if you want to try your hand at pottery, or take up roller skating, play a new instrument, or even learn another language, what matters is that it’s something you find meaningful and enjoyable.There are a ton of different classes available at the Happy Hobby Center for Health, Wellness, and Interesting Pursuits. Check our online schedule to see what piques your interest!You can even check our YouTube channel Happy Hobbies for tutorials, tips, and tricks on a wide range of topics, all taught by fellow enthusiasts!2. Rethink How You Think About Hobbies and Your TimeTo someone who’s never had a hobby before, they can seem a bit like a guilty pleasure self-indulgence. When you’re already busy working your day job and taking care of your homelife, a hobby can feel like a drain on your already limited time and energy. But a hobby is the opposite of a drain!You can reclaim bits of time from your screens and simple distractions, and repurpose them in pursuit of something that not only fulfills you, but is proven to increase your physical health, help you sleep better, lower your stress, and improve your work performance.So ditch the game on your phone in favor of playing a real game with friends. Or skip the reality TV and spend some time rocking out on the Ukulele.Check out our Hobbyist’s Accountability App to stay on track with your practice. You’ll even get daily inspirations and mindset prompts to keep you engaged with your new hobby.3. Focus on Purpose over ProductivityWhenever you start something new, there’s going to be a bit of a gap between what you love and are inspired by… and the quality of work that your skill level is capable of producing. Even DaVinci didn’t paint Mona Lisa on his first try, so forgive yourself for your first attempts and stick with it.In our achievement oriented culture, it can be hard to do things purely for enjoyment’s sake, but that’s what a hobby is. It’s an outlet for creativity and energy, and will be rewarding whether or not you become ‘successful’ at your newfound love.So challenge yourself to express for the sake of pure enjoyment, instead of rewards and accolades. Instead, find reward in the satisfaction of knowing that time and practice result in steady progress, and the knowledge that even slow mastery is a worthy pursuit.Hobbies should be low pressure, relaxing outlets for your downtime and, above all, bring you genuine joy and fulfillment.Hobbies Help Happiness!Hey there, I’m Bobby Williamson, Licensed Art Therapist, hobby enthusiast, and founder of Happy Hobby Center for Health, Wellness, and Interesting Pursuits.It’s my mission to bring the real therapy of meaningful hobbies to everyone who needs an outlet to express themselves. So I’ve created a space for all interests to come together and thrive.With weekly classes in everything from fingerpainting to juggling, music lessons to sign language speakeasies, and everything in between, there’s something for everyone, along with a community that welcomes all newcomers.I’ve been a guest on many podcasts, including “You Can Do It DIY,” and “Hobby Talk,” and you can find my new book, “Hobbies for Health and Happiness,” wherever books are sold.Build Your CommunityHere are some resources to help you on your hunt for a hobby that heals your heart and uplifts your flow.1. Love a good tutorial? Check out my Youtube Channel, Happy Hobby. Every week we share process videos by instructors at the Happy Hobby center. Like and Subscribe for all the best content to help you find your next hobby.2. Love a good inspo reel? Follow me on Instagram @HappyHobby where I share updates of new enthusiasts groups, crafting workshops, and supply hauls.3. Don’t know where to begin but know that your life is missing a passion project? Book a discovery session with me and we’ll discuss where your interests and aptitudes lie, and tour the center so you can try what’s available. You might even make a connection or two with other people who are into the same things you are!Hop on the Hobbby Wagon!Head on over to your inbox to grab the free Hobby Intro Guide based on your quiz results. It’ll give you a rundown of where to get started once you decide which hobby is right for you.Over the next few days, I'll be sharing more ideas with you, as well as a schedule of classes and social events that relate to what you’re into!“A hobby a day keeps the doldrums away.”— Phyllis McGinley
  • 4.
    Your next hobby should be... Writing!
    Words are how we communicate our thoughts, share our feelings, and overcome misunderstandings. They’re the lyrics to our favourite songs, the birthplace of our most treasured fictional friends, and the silent confessions of our deepest fears and secrets. But spoken words can be tricky, and writing things down can allow for organisation and clarity that you can’t find on the spot.Starting a writing or journaling practice is a great way to express yourself, and there’s no telling what might come out once you sit down and put pen to paper, or fingers to keyboard.Writing in a journal can be especially helpful when you’re trying to cope with anxiety and depression. Your own words become a log of your symptoms and patterns, and you can look back in reflection on your progress.A journal can also improve your memory, record important pieces of your days, and just plain help you relax at the end of a long day.In addition to these more concrete benefits, regular therapeutic writing can help you find meaning in your experiences, view things from a new perspective, and see the silver linings in your most stressful or negative experiences. It can also lead to important insights about yourself and your environment that you might have missed without further reflection.If journaling isn’t your thing, you can always try your hand at fiction, and immortalize your Boss as a Voldemort type, or your best friend as a lovable supporting character like Ron or Hermione. You can cast yourself as the hero of your story — or the villain, if that’s what floats your boat. I always was a sucker for a good villain.Simply jotting down your thoughts and feelings is a hobby that you can do solo, without the need of teams or community. But it doesn’t have to happen in a void. There are plenty of writing workshops that can help you develop a style of your own, while working with seasoned writers and learning their process.There are even tons of Author Masterclasses available online, if you’re interested in learning virtually from greats like Neil Gaiman or Margaret Atwood!Here are a few tips to help you get started as a hobby writer:1. Set yourself up for success!Choose the format that works best for you. If you need a spiral notebook and smooth writing ballpoint pen, get yourself the best you can find. If you prefer to tickle the keys on your laptop, get set up with a comfortable chair and desk situation. If you’re all about the classic journals, peruse your local bookstore and fondle the well-bound volumes until you find one that’s worthy of your words.Set a goal to write every day, and create a ritual around it to help you get centered before you start wordsmithing.If you need help getting started, consider writing down what makes you want to write in the first place.2. W.R.I.T.EA helpful acronym for therapeutic journalers.W – What do you want to write about? Name it.R – Review or reflect on it – close your eyes, take deep breaths, and focus.I – Investigate your thoughts and feelings. Just start writing and keep writing.T – Time yourself – write for 5 to 15 minutes straight.E – Exit “smart” by re-reading what you’ve written and reflecting on it.3. Look for outside inspiration and writing prompts.It can be hard to stare at a blank page when you’re first getting started. Writer’s Block is a real thing, and it isn’t just for the pros!Remember, this isn’t being graded, so feel free to write at your own pace. One day could yield a few short sentences, while another could have pages pouring out of you effortlessly.It’s isn’t important to write poetry every time you put pen to paper – sometimes just brainstorming the thoughts in your head on a scrap piece of looseleaf can untangle your emotions and help relieve stress.In the end, write as if no one else will ever read it so you can write as authentically as you can, without the pressure of impressing others.“Writing is a form of therapy; sometimes I wonder how all those who do not write, compose, or paint can manage to escape the madness, melancholia, the panic and fear which is inherent in a human situation.”― Graham GreeneWhen You’re Ready to Try Something NewIt can be easy to hop on the latest trends when you see them pop up on TikTok, but not all of us are cut out for viral dance crazes and crate challenges. For some, it’s much better to pick a passion and pursue it until our passion and our proficiency meet in a perfect place of practiced prowess.Aside from becoming super wicked good at something that interests you, hobbies can also give you lower stress, better physical health, more sleep, more social connections, improved work performance, and increased happiness!It’s important to have a passion to pursue outside of your regular work schedule, something creative as an outlet that has nothing to do with a paycheck.Regardless of whether or not you’re a seasoned Pinterest Success Story Level Hobby Crafter, or you’re just getting started with your very first coloring book purchase, here are a few tips to get you started on your next rewarding, soul filling, mental health boosting hobby:How to Hobby Like a Pinterest Pro!1. Find Something That You Actually Want To DoConsider all your options. There are outside factors like time, space, and affordability, but the most important thing is finding something that interests you enough that you’ll actually want to stick with it until you’re good at it.This could be anything! The sky's the limit, so if you want to try your hand at pottery, or take up roller skating, play a new instrument, or even learn another language, what matters is that it’s something you find meaningful and enjoyable.There are a ton of different classes available at the Happy Hobby Center for Health, Wellness, and Interesting Pursuits. Check our online schedule to see what piques your interest!You can even check our YouTube channel Happy Hobbies for tutorials, tips, and tricks on a wide range of topics, all taught by fellow enthusiasts!2. Rethink How You Think About Hobbies and Your TimeTo someone who’s never had a hobby before, they can seem a bit like a guilty pleasure self-indulgence. When you’re already busy working your day job and taking care of your homelife, a hobby can feel like a drain on your already limited time and energy. But a hobby is the opposite of a drain!You can reclaim bits of time from your screens and simple distractions, and repurpose them in pursuit of something that not only fulfills you, but is proven to increase your physical health, help you sleep better, lower your stress, and improve your work performance.So ditch the game on your phone in favor of playing a real game with friends. Or skip the reality TV and spend some time rocking out on the Ukulele.Check out our Hobbyist’s Accountability App to stay on track with your practice. You’ll even get daily inspirations and mindset prompts to keep you engaged with your new hobby.3. Focus on Purpose over ProductivityWhenever you start something new, there’s going to be a bit of a gap between what you love and are inspired by… and the quality of work that your skill level is capable of producing. Even DaVinci didn’t paint Mona Lisa on his first try, so forgive yourself for your first attempts and stick with it.In our achievement oriented culture, it can be hard to do things purely for enjoyment’s sake, but that’s what a hobby is. It’s an outlet for creativity and energy, and will be rewarding whether or not you become ‘successful’ at your newfound love.So challenge yourself to express for the sake of pure enjoyment, instead of rewards and accolades. Instead, find reward in the satisfaction of knowing that time and practice result in steady progress, and the knowledge that even slow mastery is a worthy pursuit.Hobbies should be low pressure, relaxing outlets for your downtime and, above all, bring you genuine joy and fulfillment.Hobbies Help Happiness!Hey there, I’m Bobby Williamson, Licensed Art Therapist, hobby enthusiast, and founder of Happy Hobby Center for Health, Wellness, and Interesting Pursuits.It’s my mission to bring the real therapy of meaningful hobbies to everyone who needs an outlet to express themselves. So I’ve created a space for all interests to come together and thrive.With weekly classes in everything from fingerpainting to juggling, music lessons to sign language speakeasies, and everything in between, there’s something for everyone, along with a community that welcomes all newcomers.I’ve been a guest on many podcasts, including “You Can Do It DIY,” and “Hobby Talk,” and you can find my new book, “Hobbies for Health and Happiness,” wherever books are sold.Build Your CommunityHere are some resources to help you on your hunt for a hobby that heals your heart and uplifts your flow.1. Love a good tutorial? Check out my Youtube Channel, Happy Hobby. Every week we share process videos by instructors at the Happy Hobby center. Like and Subscribe for all the best content to help you find your next hobby.2. Love a good inspo reel? Follow me on Instagram @HappyHobby where I share updates of new enthusiasts groups, crafting workshops, and supply hauls.3. Don’t know where to begin but know that your life is missing a passion project? Book a discovery session with me and we’ll discuss where your interests and aptitudes lie, and tour the center so you can try what’s available. You might even make a connection or two with other people who are into the same things you are!Hop on the Hobbby Wagon!Head on over to your inbox to grab the free Hobby Intro Guide based on your quiz results. It’ll give you a rundown of where to get started once you decide which hobby is right for you.Over the next few days, I'll be sharing more ideas with you, as well as a schedule of classes and social events that relate to what you’re into!“A hobby a day keeps the doldrums away.”— Phyllis McGinley