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What is Your Biggest TBI Struggle?

Pinpoint your biggest struggle after your brain injury and find providers who can help you recover.

Quiz Questions

  • 1.
    Which of the following symptoms describe your biggest concern regarding your brain injury? (Choose up to 3.)
    • A.
      Difficulty thinking or brain fog
      (Correlates to: Thinking & Brain Fog)
    • B.
      Pain
      (Correlates to: Headaches, Pain, or Dizziness)
    • C.
      Dizziness
      (Correlates to: Headaches, Pain, or Dizziness)
    • D.
      Problems with vision
      (Correlates to: Vision, Sound, and Sleeping)
    • E.
      Difficulty sleeping
      (Correlates to: Vision, Sound, and Sleeping)
    • F.
      Fatigue
      (Correlates to: Fatigue)
    • G.
      Problems with walking
      (Correlates to: Walking)
    • H.
      Depression/anxiety
      (Correlates to: Depression, Anxiety, & Moods)
    • I.
      Trouble using hands or arms
      (Correlates to: Difficulties with Arms and Hands)
    • J.
      None of these describe my TBI struggles
      (Correlates to: )
  • 2.
    Do you experience pain?
    • A.
      Always!
      (Correlates to: Headaches, Pain, or Dizziness)
    • B.
      Rarely, if ever.
      (Correlates to: )
  • 3.
    Has your vision changed?
    • A.
      Yes
      (Correlates to: Vision, Sound, and Sleeping)
    • B.
      No
      (Correlates to: )
  • 4.
    What motor skills have changed since your injury?
    • A.
      Arms and Hands
      (Correlates to: Difficulties with Arms and Hands)
    • B.
      Legs
      (Correlates to: Walking)
    • C.
      None
      (Correlates to: )
  • 5.
    How would you describe challenges with walking?
    • A.
      I love walking! No problems.
      (Correlates to: )
    • B.
      I have trouble with my balance
      (Correlates to: Walking)
    • C.
      Walking is really difficult
      (Correlates to: Walking)
  • 6.
    Do you have any dizziness?
    • A.
      Yes! All of the time.
      (Correlates to: Headaches, Pain, or Dizziness)
    • B.
      Sometimes, especially when there is a lot going on.
      (Correlates to: Headaches, Pain, or Dizziness)
    • C.
      Rarely or never
      (Correlates to: )
  • 7.
    What is sleep like for you?
    • A.
      Sleep, what sleep? Haven't slept soundly since my accident.
      (Correlates to: Vision, Sound, and Sleeping)
    • B.
      I sleep like a baby, no problems!
      (Correlates to: )
  • 8.
    What's your biggest mental challenge since your TBI?
    • A.
      Trouble thinking or brain fog
      (Correlates to: Thinking & Brain Fog)
    • B.
      Organizing my time and space
      (Correlates to: Thinking & Brain Fog)
    • C.
      Multi-tasking is hard
      (Correlates to: Thinking & Brain Fog)
    • D.
      Difficulty speaking or understanding speech
      (Correlates to: Thinking & Brain Fog)
    • E.
      Difficulty remembering
      (Correlates to: )
    • F.
      None of these describe me
      (Correlates to: )
  • 9.
    How is your mental health doing?
    • A.
      I am feeling down and depressed
      (Correlates to: Depression, Anxiety, & Moods)
    • B.
      Anxiety is a struggle
      (Correlates to: Depression, Anxiety, & Moods)
    • C.
      Holy moods, Batman! Can't keep myself even emotionally
      (Correlates to: )
    • D.
      Things are tough but I'm handling it like a champion
      (Correlates to: )

Quiz Outcomes

  • 1.
    Difficulties with Arms and Hands
    Brain injuries can lead to weakness and poor coordination in your arms or hands. Many brain injury survivors experience problems using their hands for everyday tasks, like getting dressed, writing and eating. Relearning these essential skills fosters independence in self-care and household duties, which plays a massive roll in gaining your dignity and confidence to move forward.
  • 2.
    Headaches, Pain, or Dizziness
    A medical doctor who focuses on physical medicine and rehabilitation is known as a physiatrist. If you find one who specializes in brain injury, his or her care can be a fantastic place to start as you navigate your way through these symptoms. Brain injury symptoms vary widely from person to person. Common troubles include headaches, pain, or dizziness.
  • 3.
    Vision, Sound, and Sleeping
    Some brain injury survivors have a problem with their vision, are sensitive to sound, or have difficulty sleeping. A medical doctor who focuses on physical medicine and rehabilitation is known as a physiatrist. If you find one who specializes in brain injury, his or her care can be a fantastic place to start as you navigate your way through these symptoms. A neurologist who works with people with brain injury can also help. Some survivors have a problem with their vision, are sensitive to sound, or have difficulty sleeping.
  • 4.
    Fatigue
    Fatigue plagues a vast majority of brain injury survivors. A medical doctor who focuses on physical medicine and rehabilitation is known as a physiatrist. If you find one who specializes in brain injury, his or her care can be a fantastic place to start as you navigate your way through these symptoms. These doctors may refer you to a sleep medicine specialist to help create a pathway for restful and restorative sleep.
  • 5.
    Walking
    Many brain injury survivors experience difficulty walking. Taking steps may now be strained, slow or even painful. Complex motor skills depend on nerve signals from the brain working correctly. These signals may have been damaged during your injury. Sometimes moving is hard. Even after a mild brain injury, your balance and coordination may be off.
  • 6.
    Thinking & Brain Fog
    Of all things a brain does for you, thinking is one of the most important. The simple act of paying attention and remembering can be grueling work for someone with a brain injury. It may be harder to focus on the instructor during class or paying attention at work. Remembering details, appointments, the order of events, and conversations can seem impossible. Planning your time, scheduling meetings, or organizing your work tasks may be difficult. Multi-tasking before your injury was no big deal; now you can only focus on one task at a time, period. Brain fog isn’t just a passing moment, for many TBI survivors. Brain fog exhibits with moments of panic, feelings of being disoriented and clusters of confusion. Some survivors are impulsive, not able to control themselves like they used to. You may also have difficulty speaking or understanding what is said to you.
  • 7.
    Depression, Anxiety, & Moods
    Brain injuries often lead to depression and anxiety. There is a physical component if your injury has compromised the brain’s ability to create serotonin and dopamine. However, depression and anxiety show up quite often as a secondary symptom of increased stress, decreased functioning with day-to-day tasks, new physical limitations, and strained relationships as you navigate a new normal.