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What type of filmmaker are you?

So you want to be a filmmaker? 🎬 Find out what cinematic style thoroughly expresses your unique personality. So that the movies you create are a thoughtful and complete expression of who you are. The history of cinema is waiting for you to leave your mark!

Quiz Questions

  • 1.
    Which iconic director MOST inspires you?
    • A.
      Stanley Kubrick. His visionary films seriously altar your mind, and deeply shift how you see things. 
      (Correlates to: You're a… Cerebral Cinematic)
    • B.
      Vittorio De Sica. His humanist approach to storytelling hits deeply to the heart of an audience.
      (Correlates to: You’re a... Romantic Realist)
    • C.
      Steven Spielberg. Who isn't spellbound by iconic films like Jaws, ET, and The Road To Perdition? 
      (Correlates to: You’re a… Studio Sensation)
    • D.
      Agnes Varda. Her visual poetry and rhythmic storytelling is a breath of fresh air. She's the mother of the New Wave! 
      (Correlates to: You're an… Artful Auteur)
  • 2.
    What inspires you to want to make movies?
    • A.
      I view film as an art form. I want to play with the visual medium, and be in conversation with the history of film itself.
      (Correlates to: You're an… Artful Auteur)
    • B.
      I want to make films that help people to feel less alone. That connect people while highlighting essential social truths. 
      (Correlates to: You’re a... Romantic Realist)
    • C.
      I want to create altered spaces and states of consciousness through cinema. I want to give people an experience of mystery and wonder.  
      (Correlates to: You're a… Cerebral Cinematic)
    • D.
      I want to make movies that delight, inspire, and entertain. I've always been a film buff, and movies are almost my whole life.
      (Correlates to: You’re a… Studio Sensation)
  • 3.
    Which iconic movie song moves you the MOST?
    • A.
      "I Will Always Love You" by Whitney Houston, The Bodyguard. "And I... will always love you/ I... will always love you/ You, ooh"
      (Correlates to: You’re a... Romantic Realist)
    • B.
      "Moon River" by Andy Williams, Breakfast at Tiffany's. "Moon river, wider than a mile/ I'm crossing you in style some day"  
      (Correlates to: You’re a… Studio Sensation)
    • C.
      "Let Go" by Frou Frou, Garden State. "So let go, yeah let go, just get in/ Oh, it's so amazing here, it's alright/ 'Cause there's beauty in the breakdown"  
      (Correlates to: You're an… Artful Auteur)
    • D.
      "Mrs. Robinson" by Paul Simon. The Graduate. "Hide it in the hiding place where no one ever goes/ Put it in your pantry with your cupcakes"
      (Correlates to: You're a… Cerebral Cinematic)
  • 4.
    *Poof!* Your fairy godmother is here and she's going to grant you one wish to ignite your film career! What wish would light you up the most?
    • A.
      I'd like the best agent in town who will totally go to bat for me and land me my dream gigs.
      (Correlates to: )
    • B.
      I'd like my script or film concept to get accepted into a prestigious lab like Sundance. 
      (Correlates to: )
    • C.
      I'd like my current film to win an award at a major film festival.
      (Correlates to: )
    • D.
      I'd like absolute clarity about my artistic vision and how to produce my film myself. 
      (Correlates to: )
  • 5.
    Fill in the blank. If I had more _____, I would have a better shot as a filmmaker.
    • A.
      Confidence and charm.  
      (Correlates to: )
    • B.
      Financial resources. 
      (Correlates to: )
    • C.
      Skills and experience. 
      (Correlates to: )
    • D.
      Industry connections. 
      (Correlates to: )
  • 6.
    You're working on a film set. If you weren't the director, what would be your role?
    • A.
      I'm playing the lead in the film, of course!
      (Correlates to: You’re a… Studio Sensation)
    • B.
      I'm the costume designer. You know this movie's going to have some serious style.
      (Correlates to: You're an… Artful Auteur)
    • C.
      I'm the producer. I'm rocking my natural people skills to keep everyone from shouting at each other.
      (Correlates to: You’re a... Romantic Realist)
    • D.
      I'm the cinematographer...acting as a technical wizard, and bringing the director's vision to life through my camera skills.
      (Correlates to: You're a… Cerebral Cinematic)
  • 7.
    How long have you been pursuing filmmaking?
    • A.
      I've loved movies for a long time, but I've just recently committed to making this a real thing. 
      (Correlates to: )
    • B.
      Under a year, but I'm in it to win it. I really want to make some strides in the next year. 
      (Correlates to: )
    • C.
      I've been chipping away for a few years now. I'm ready to break through and get seen. 
      (Correlates to: )
    • D.
      I've been pursuing filmmaking for as long as I can remember. I've had some wins and now it's time for a different level of success. 
      (Correlates to: )
    • E.
      None of the above, I'm carving my own path. 
      (Correlates to: )
  • 8.
    Congrats, you just won a film-buff approved vacation and a 4K camera! Where you gonna go to capture some great footage?
    • A.
      Paris, France. I want to shoot the everyday poetry of the beautiful streets. Just like a French new-wave filmmaker. I'll also find inspiration from the impressionist paintings at the Musee D'Orsay. 
      (Correlates to: You're an… Artful Auteur)
    • B.
      Tokyo, Japan. Inspired by Lost in Translation, I'd take in all the neon lights, cultural nuances. I'd shoot the contrast between the landscapes and city streets of this fascinating metropolis. 
      (Correlates to: You're a… Cerebral Cinematic)
    • C.
      London, England. I want to visit the famous Notting Hill Bookshop, drink tea, and read leather-bound books in an iconic library. You could say it'll be a romantic voyage.
      (Correlates to: You’re a... Romantic Realist)
    • D.
      New Zealand. I'd travel all around the country and revel in the mystical and breathtaking landscapes that were featured in Lord of the Rings.
      (Correlates to: You’re a… Studio Sensation)
  • 9.
    Which of these quotes about film MOST resonates with you?
    • A.
      "Good cinema is good cinema. It makes you feel like you need to work. Just yesterday I saw a good film, but even if I'd seen a bad one, I'd feel, 'Oh my god, what a bad job, I can do better.'" — Agnes Varda
      (Correlates to: You're a… Cerebral Cinematic)
    • B.
      “The film of tomorrow appears to me as even more personal than an individual and autobiographical novel, like a confession, or a diary." — François Truffaut 
      (Correlates to: You're an… Artful Auteur)
    • C.
      “When people ask me if I went to film school, I tell them, 'No, I went to films.'” — Quentin Tarantino 
      (Correlates to: You’re a… Studio Sensation)
    • D.
      “The characters in my films try to live honestly and make the most of the lives they’ve been given. I believe you must live honestly and develop your abilities to the full. People who do this are the real heroes.” — Akira Kurosawa 
      (Correlates to: You’re a... Romantic Realist)

Quiz Outcomes

  • 1.
    You’re a… Studio Sensation
    You're bold, determined, and have power leadership skills. As a director, you'd be able to get people behind a movie with a big vision and a big budget. Because you're great at delegating and you like to set powerful goals, creating a feature film on a large scale is something you could absolutely pull off. You actually have the visionary skills to produce something truly great, which is no small feat. Your other super-power? You totally thrive under pressure. In terms of storylines that move you, look to the hero's journey. You'd shine by telling a story of a human achievement, and triumphing over challenges. Above all, choose storylines where your hero has a strong goal... a goal worth rooting for. Traditionally, this kind of film is the Oscar-Winning Drama, but it could also skew to more artful or experimental film that holds a big vision. You're cut out for genres like action/adventure, drama, and biographies.Filmmakers who share your visionary style include: Peter Jackson, Steven Spielberg, Orson Welles, and Billy Wilder. Or for a more alternative directing style look to Quentin Tarantino.Here's a tip for you to feel great on set:Although leadership skills are incredibly important for a director, it's also essential for you to be a team player. Because the best films are born out of the greatest collaborations. So listen to your collaborators and ask questions. Consider taking notes from the experts you know you can trust, even if the notes seem like tough medicine. "Whether in success or in failure, I'm proud of every single movie I've directed." — Steven Spielberg Taking The HelmHere Are 3 Tips Every Filmmaker Needs to Move Forward in their Moviemaking1. Idea NotebookInspiration can strike at any moment, especially when you give yourself the space for it. Keep a small notebook in your back pocket (literally!) for daily ideas, inspirations, and images. For bonus points, try the "idea-a-day" exercise. For one month, write down a new idea for a movie every day. Sure, some of these ideas are bound to be so-so. But, writing down a new movie concept every day will also help you find new, strange, interesting, and inspiring hooks that you might not have thought about unless you gave your muse the time and attention. 2. Just Make SomethingAlways be working on something. Sure, it may take time before you can get the funding for your feature to go through. But there's no reason not to be ideating and generating. Especially with the ease of technology nowadays. Why is it important to just make films no matter what?Many aspiring directors think they have to know everything before they can direct something. But the truth about directing is that you're going to learn on set. You're going to understand what really happens in a shoot where your strengths lie, and what skills you need to develop. You also need space to make the stupid mistakes, so that when you actually have a serious project and budget behind you, you know from experience what not to do. That practical knowledge is invaluable. 3. Build Your CommunityDon't wait for fame and fortune to knock on your door. Most directors who really make it get there through hard work and cultivating their relationships. So connect with your filmmaking community. Make yourself useful to them. Show up. Go to events. Do whatever you can to grow your network and water the seeds of your relationships.If you get known for being helpful, kind, and doing good work...that reputation will serve you very well indeed. And of course, always be kind. If you operate from a space of authentic generosity, the word will get around. This quality is what sets the pros apart, because filmmaking is always a team sport. I'm Ready for My Closeup...Hello you cinematic visionary! I'm Andrea Apple, creative director, movie producer, and coach to up-and-coming filmmakers. I work with directors to help them hone their craft, jumpstart their careers, and not waste any precious time. I sharpened my skills as an agent at CAA, before falling in love with movie producing. As a producer, I've worked with iconic production companies from Focus Features to Sony Pictures Entertainment. I now teach producing at UCLA.What made me stand out as an agent and producer is my knack for hacking mindset. I know how to work with directors to get them in the zone, and keep them in the zone. It's my mission to help important directors like you trust your voice, and get your voice out there. What's my favorite movie? That quiz questions like asking me to reveal my soul to you but here goes: it's La Dolce Vita!Become the Next New WaveHere Are Some Resources to Hone Your Zone of Cinematic Genius Immediately...1. Watch my producing workshop with UCLA Film School's Graduate Directing Students. In this two-hour workshop, I share my go-to tools for independent producing. These tricks will seriously save you years of banging your head against the wall. Walk away with a strong sense of how to nail your first feature film. 2. Read my Blog: Directorial Debut. Each week, I share mindset hacks, networking tips, and unexpected ways for you to make a name for yourself as a director. Several A-list directors you may know and love swear by these techniques. 3. Follow me on Instagram. Instagram's my go-to for giving inspiration, answering your questions, and providing on the spot coaching. Every month, I feature another rising filmmaker in a hot seat session, where we talk about how they can get their work out there. Maybe the next one will be with you! 💡 Blow Up💡I hope your results are already giving you some ideas to inspire your next film. Check your inbox to get your quiz results and snag some more choice tips for your directorial development.Over the next week, I'm going to be sharing more ideas with you about how you can move forward toward your dream of making movies. At the end of the day, movies are the space of dreams. If you have a film (or many films) within you, I'm here to encourage you to go for it with all you've got. With new innovations in filmmaking and movie theaters being in jeopardy, the film industry is opening up. Nobody knows what film is going to become.🎞️ It's your time to shape the future of filmmaking 📽️
  • 2.
    You're an… Artful Auteur
    You're endlessly artistic and you love to innovate. Your creative style means that as a director, you're not going to make just any old movie. You're here to stand by your artistic vision and make a film that leaves a mark on the "Cahiers Du Cinema."As a natural artist, you have a poetic approach to life. Your aesthetic is extremely important to you and you have a strong sense of beauty. This means that on top of a great story, your filmmaking style is all about style. The French New Wave is a film movement for you to look to for endless inspiration. Because you're here to reflect on the art of cinema itself. For inspiration, take a look at the films of Francois Truffaut, Agnes Varda, and late new-wave artist Eric Rohmer. Contemporary directors like Wes Anderson and Sophia Coppola are also your film-style buddies. From the costumes, to the art direction, to the music… you want to create an experiential vibe that's also absolutely iconic. Because the look and feel of your films is super important, it's essential for you to have people on your team who can bring out your aesthetic. Here's a tip for you to let your inner director shine:You’re a people person and you love to make sure everyone's happy with how the film is going. But when you're directing, you need to lead. That means making tough decisions that may ruffle a few feathers. It's simply impossible to please everyone on a film set. So it's essential to you to have strong boundaries, stick to your guns, and let go of any fear of people disagreeing with you. Know that above all, your job is to make a movie that is excellent. That sometimes means being uncompromising in your creative vision. “I tried to find a language for the film - not just telling stories. I picked the Picasso painting because it said more than I could explain. I need images, I need representation which deals in other means than reality." — Agnes VardaTaking The HelmHere Are 3 Tips Every Filmmaker Needs to Move Forward in their Moviemaking1. Idea NotebookInspiration can strike at any moment, especially when you give yourself the space for it. Keep a small notebook in your back pocket (literally!) for daily ideas, inspirations, and images. For bonus points, try the "idea-a-day" exercise. For one month, write down a new idea for a movie every day. Sure, some of these ideas are bound to be so-so. But, writing down a new movie concept every day will also help you find new, strange, interesting, and inspiring hooks that you might not have thought about unless you gave your muse the time and attention. 2. Just Make SomethingAlways be working on something. Sure, it may take time before you can get the funding for your feature to go through. But there's no reason not to be ideating and generating. Especially with the ease of technology nowadays. Why is it important to just make films no matter what?Many aspiring directors think they have to know everything before they can direct something. But the truth about directing is that you're going to learn on set. You're going to understand what really happens in a shoot where your strengths lie, and what skills you need to develop. You also need space to make the stupid mistakes, so that when you actually have a serious project and budget behind you, you know from experience what not to do. That practical knowledge is invaluable. 3. Build Your CommunityDon't wait for fame and fortune to knock on your door. Most directors who really make it get there through hard work and cultivating their relationships. So connect with your filmmaking community. Make yourself useful to them. Show up. Go to events. Do whatever you can to grow your network and water the seeds of your relationships.If you get known for being helpful, kind, and doing good work...that reputation will serve you very well indeed. And of course, always be kind. If you operate from a space of authentic generosity, the word will get around. This quality is what sets the pros apart, because filmmaking is always a team sport. I'm Ready for My Closeup...Hello you cinematic visionary! I'm Andrea Apple, creative director, movie producer, and coach to up-and-coming filmmakers. I work with directors to help them hone their craft, jumpstart their careers, and not waste any precious time. I sharpened my skills as an agent at CAA, before falling in love with movie producing. As a producer, I've worked with iconic production companies from Focus Features to Sony Pictures Entertainment. I now teach producing at UCLA.What made me stand out as an agent and producer is my knack for hacking mindset. I know how to work with directors to get them in the zone, and keep them in the zone. It's my mission to help important directors like you trust your voice, and get your voice out there. What's my favorite movie? That quiz questions like asking me to reveal my soul to you but here goes: it's La Dolce Vita!Become the Next New WaveHere Are Some Resources to Hone Your Zone of Cinematic Genius Immediately...1. Watch my producing workshop with UCLA Film School's Graduate Directing Students. In this two-hour workshop, I share my go-to tools for independent producing. These tricks will seriously save you years of banging your head against the wall. Walk away with a strong sense of how to nail your first feature film. 2. Read my Blog: Directorial Debut. Each week, I share mindset hacks, networking tips, and unexpected ways for you to make a name for yourself as a director. Several A-list directors you may know and love swear by these techniques. 3. Follow me on Instagram. Instagram's my go-to for giving inspiration, answering your questions, and providing on the spot coaching. Every month, I feature another rising filmmaker in a hot seat session, where we talk about how they can get their work out there. Maybe the next one will be with you! 💡 Blow Up💡I hope your results are already giving you some ideas to inspire your next film. Check your inbox to get your quiz results and snag some more choice tips for your directorial development.Over the next week, I'm going to be sharing more ideas with you about how you can move forward toward your dream of making movies. At the end of the day, movies are the space of dreams. If you have a film (or many films) within you, I'm here to encourage you to go for it with all you've got. With new innovations in filmmaking and movie theaters being in jeopardy, the film industry is opening up. Nobody knows what film is going to become.🎞️ It's your time to shape the future of filmmaking 📽️
  • 3.
    You’re a... Romantic Realist
    You love relationships, love, and stories of human connection. You excel when you focus your directorial lens on powerful relationships and community. You are also compassionate, kind, and a great listener. Your strong sense of community means that you’re here to inspire people to come together and improve their lives. The genre of realism which gives an intimate slice of life account that often highlights social issues is up your alley. You can look at filmmakers like Roberto Rossellini, Andrea Arnold, and Vittorio de Sica to inspire you.You may also wish to push realism further and actually create documentaries. Think about bringing to light societal challenges that are near and dear to your big heart. Creating movies that underscore the depth of human connection will really light you up. This means you'd also shine by directing romances and films about friendship. Even rom coms! Make a list of your favorite romances (I bet you have many) and start defining what your own take on the genre might look like.Norwegian filmmakers are the masters of the theme of Friendship. Check out North by Rune Denstad Langlo, O'Horten by Bent Hamer and Elling by Petter Næss for inspiration. Here's a tip to feel more confident on set:Because you're a natural nurturer, it may be challenging for you to stand firm in your own opinions. But as the director, it's important for you to take center stage. Remember that being decisive, and holding fast to a vision is going to inspire confidence in your team. In fact, it'll actually help them to feel supported. Don't be afraid to rock the boat, instead get comfortable steering the ship. Make sure you have a few people in your corner who you can really lean on when needed. “Film is, to me, just unimportant. But people are very important.” — John CassavetesTaking The HelmHere Are 3 Tips Every Filmmaker Needs to Move Forward in their Moviemaking1. Idea NotebookInspiration can strike at any moment, especially when you give yourself the space for it. Keep a small notebook in your back pocket (literally!) for daily ideas, inspirations, and images. For bonus points, try the "idea-a-day" exercise. For one month, write down a new idea for a movie every day. Sure, some of these ideas are bound to be so-so. But, writing down a new movie concept every day will also help you find new, strange, interesting, and inspiring hooks that you might not have thought about unless you gave your muse the time and attention. 2. Just Make SomethingAlways be working on something. Sure, it may take time before you can get the funding for your feature to go through. But there's no reason not to be ideating and generating. Especially with the ease of technology nowadays. Why is it important to just make films no matter what?Many aspiring directors think they have to know everything before they can direct something. But the truth about directing is that you're going to learn on set. You're going to understand what really happens in a shoot where your strengths lie, and what skills you need to develop. You also need space to make the stupid mistakes, so that when you actually have a serious project and budget behind you, you know from experience what not to do. That practical knowledge is invaluable. 3. Build Your CommunityDon't wait for fame and fortune to knock on your door. Most directors who really make it get there through hard work and cultivating their relationships. So connect with your filmmaking community. Make yourself useful to them. Show up. Go to events. Do whatever you can to grow your network and water the seeds of your relationships.If you get known for being helpful, kind, and doing good work...that reputation will serve you very well indeed. And of course, always be kind. If you operate from a space of authentic generosity, the word will get around. This quality is what sets the pros apart, because filmmaking is always a team sport. I'm Ready for My Closeup...Hello you cinematic visionary! I'm Andrea Apple, creative director, movie producer, and coach to up-and-coming filmmakers. I work with directors to help them hone their craft, jumpstart their careers, and not waste any precious time. I sharpened my skills as an agent at CAA, before falling in love with movie producing. As a producer, I've worked with iconic production companies from Focus Features to Sony Pictures Entertainment. I now teach producing at UCLA.What made me stand out as an agent and producer is my knack for hacking mindset. I know how to work with directors to get them in the zone, and keep them in the zone. It's my mission to help important directors like you trust your voice, and get your voice out there. What's my favorite movie? That quiz questions like asking me to reveal my soul to you but here goes: it's La Dolce Vita!Become the Next New WaveHere Are Some Resources to Hone Your Zone of Cinematic Genius Immediately...1. Watch my producing workshop with UCLA Film School's Graduate Directing Students. In this two-hour workshop, I share my go-to tools for independent producing. These tricks will seriously save you years of banging your head against the wall. Walk away with a strong sense of how to nail your first feature film. 2. Read my Blog: Directorial Debut. Each week, I share mindset hacks, networking tips, and unexpected ways for you to make a name for yourself as a director. Several A-list directors you may know and love swear by these techniques. 3. Follow me on Instagram. Instagram's my go-to for giving inspiration, answering your questions, and providing on the spot coaching. Every month, I feature another rising filmmaker in a hot seat session, where we talk about how they can get their work out there. Maybe the next one will be with you! 💡 Blow Up💡I hope your results are already giving you some ideas to inspire your next film. Check your inbox to get your quiz results and snag some more choice tips for your directorial development.Over the next week, I'm going to be sharing more ideas with you about how you can move forward toward your dream of making movies. At the end of the day, movies are the space of dreams. If you have a film (or many films) within you, I'm here to encourage you to go for it with all you've got. With new innovations in filmmaking and movie theaters being in jeopardy, the film industry is opening up. Nobody knows what film is going to become.🎞️ It's your time to shape the future of filmmaking 📽️
  • 4.
    You're a… Cerebral Cinematic
    You're deep, wise, and highly intelligent. The cerebral film is where you can really shine as a director. It'll show off your innate ability to observe the world around you.From Italian neorealists, to Akira Kurasawa's deep portraits of humanity, you can seriously get down with a serious film. To you, filmmaking is about making a powerful statement… a film that makes people think, leaves, a lasting impression, and may also be thought of as a puzzle or a challenge.Consider Japanese Filmmakers whose technical skill and subtle storytelling may very well speak to your sensibility. Genres for you to consider include: sci-fi, mysteries, and psychological thrillers. Contemporary filmmakers who share your style include Daniel Villaneuve, Paul Thomas Anderson, and Christopher Nolan.The most important hire for you? Your DP. You and your cinematographer need to have a complete mind-meld to get your experimental vision on screen. Your second most important? Your editor. That's because visionary films are often revolutionary in their editing style. Here's a tip for you to hone your directing skills:You are analytical and thoughtful to a T. Sometimes this means you're a bit of a perfectionist. On the one hand, that's not a bad quality for a director, because at the end of the day...everything falls on you. At the same time, make sure you're not holding your crew to impossible standards. Having a solid producing team who can also handle all of the different personality types on set is super important to you. That way you can focus on getting the most out of every scene. You also might want to take time really listening to your actors and connecting with them, so that you develop a deep bond. Use your great listening skills to make them feel really seen. You'll be amazed by the great insights they will add to your approach. "The role of the artist is to not look away." – Akira KurosawaTaking The HelmHere Are 3 Tips Every Filmmaker Needs to Move Forward in their Moviemaking1. Idea NotebookInspiration can strike at any moment, especially when you give yourself the space for it. Keep a small notebook in your back pocket (literally!) for daily ideas, inspirations, and images. For bonus points, try the "idea-a-day" exercise. For one month, write down a new idea for a movie every day. Sure, some of these ideas are bound to be so-so. But, writing down a new movie concept every day will also help you find new, strange, interesting, and inspiring hooks that you might not have thought about unless you gave your muse the time and attention. 2. Just Make SomethingAlways be working on something. Sure, it may take time before you can get the funding for your feature to go through. But there's no reason not to be ideating and generating. Especially with the ease of technology nowadays. Why is it important to just make films no matter what?Many aspiring directors think they have to know everything before they can direct something. But the truth about directing is that you're going to learn on set. You're going to understand what really happens in a shoot where your strengths lie, and what skills you need to develop. You also need space to make the stupid mistakes, so that when you actually have a serious project and budget behind you, you know from experience what not to do. That practical knowledge is invaluable. 3. Build Your CommunityDon't wait for fame and fortune to knock on your door. Most directors who really make it get there through hard work and cultivating their relationships. So connect with your filmmaking community. Make yourself useful to them. Show up. Go to events. Do whatever you can to grow your network and water the seeds of your relationships.If you get known for being helpful, kind, and doing good work...that reputation will serve you very well indeed. And of course, always be kind. If you operate from a space of authentic generosity, the word will get around. This quality is what sets the pros apart, because filmmaking is always a team sport. I'm Ready for My Closeup...Hello you cinematic visionary! I'm Andrea Apple, creative director, movie producer, and coach to up-and-coming filmmakers. I work with directors to help them hone their craft, jumpstart their careers, and not waste any precious time. I sharpened my skills as an agent at CAA, before falling in love with movie producing. As a producer, I've worked with iconic production companies from Focus Features to Sony Pictures Entertainment. I now teach producing at UCLA.What made me stand out as an agent and producer is my knack for hacking mindset. I know how to work with directors to get them in the zone, and keep them in the zone. It's my mission to help important directors like you trust your voice, and get your voice out there. What's my favorite movie? That quiz questions like asking me to reveal my soul to you but here goes: it's La Dolce Vita!Become the Next New WaveHere Are Some Resources to Hone Your Zone of Cinematic Genius Immediately...1. Watch my producing workshop with UCLA Film School's Graduate Directing Students. In this two-hour workshop, I share my go-to tools for independent producing. These tricks will seriously save you years of banging your head against the wall. Walk away with a strong sense of how to nail your first feature film. 2. Read my Blog: Directorial Debut. Each week, I share mindset hacks, networking tips, and unexpected ways for you to make a name for yourself as a director. Several A-list directors you may know and love swear by these techniques. 3. Follow me on Instagram. Instagram's my go-to for giving inspiration, answering your questions, and providing on the spot coaching. Every month, I feature another rising filmmaker in a hot seat session, where we talk about how they can get their work out there. Maybe the next one will be with you! 💡 Blow Up💡I hope your results are already giving you some ideas to inspire your next film. Check your inbox to get your quiz results and snag some more choice tips for your directorial development.Over the next week, I'm going to be sharing more ideas with you about how you can move forward toward your dream of making movies. At the end of the day, movies are the space of dreams. If you have a film (or many films) within you, I'm here to encourage you to go for it with all you've got. With new innovations in filmmaking and movie theaters being in jeopardy, the film industry is opening up. Nobody knows what film is going to become.🎞️ It's your time to shape the future of filmmaking 📽️